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Elijah

New X-coils 20" Mono

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Did you make this video Elijah? I like the way they did the hole in the ground.  Looks good.

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Yes of course,  I am create this video....Tests with other coils are coming soon

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    • By phrunt
      I have ordered a new size X-coil, it's a 12x8" X-Coil,  It's already in the post however it's delayed in shipping due to international shipping delays the world over.  Hopefully this coil arrives soon. I am very excited about it as I think it will be the perfect size for NZ.
      It's even in NZ's black and white colours.

      This should be good in our rocky terrain on small gold.
       
    • By phrunt
      There has been a lot of  talk lately about gold being found on or off bedrock, I've personally done well finding gold in soil, even my biggest bit to date has been in soil.  JW found this little soil ridge well up above bedrock, it's soil all the way to ground level 50 to 100 feet below along the top of the ridge, as you go down the sides of it the gold disappeared, oddly right at the top of this ridge has been a very productive spot for gold for us both.  We did a number of posts about it at the time last summer when we were going there on the bike ride of death along a little track with a big drop.
      Today I was given a couple of videos of more gold being found and again the gold was in soil so I thought I'd show you the videos.  Gold is where you find it 🙂 Rules don't seem to apply.
      These two videos are the 10" X-coil and filmed yesterday.
      This sort of thing is familiar to me, this is often how I have found gold, just in soil and oddly most of my biggest bits have been found the same way which I've often posted about in the past and they've been in spots hammered by everyone around here, so the likely reason I found them is nobody bothered to detect the soft loamy soil areas instead targeting mostly the bedrock.

      Here is the photo for the total of the day

    • By phrunt
      I was sent some photos overnight of some incredible finds with the GPX and an X-coil that forum member Elijah found.  I thought I'd put the photos up for people to see as they're pretty incredible, I really love the old coin, imagine the history that goes with an old coin like that, I can't even imagine how old it must be  It must have been a very wealthy person that lost it.  I would love to detect in locations that have ancient coins like this.  It looks like they just take a big nugget and stamp an image on it.

      It looks like a bird of some sort?



      And check out it's weight!!!!

      That coins heavy! I wonder what you could buy with it when it was used as currency.
      He also found this, I'm not sure what it could be, any ideas?  It's likely to be very ancient too.

    • By phrunt
      X-coils have made an absolute Monster of a coil for the GPZ 7000.    It was only a month or so ago the 26" X-coil was released for the GPX/QED, now a 25" has been made for the GPZ. 
      These coils were designed for Russia as they have a lot of big deep gold as well as old golden relics and coins.
      The new X-coil 25" GPZ coil is bundle wound like traditional Minelab coils and weighs less than the genuine Minelab GPZ 19" Coil at 1800 grams including skid plate.



      I am betting this would find some bigger deeper gold missed in Australia 🙂
       
    • By Elijah
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    • By jasong
      I put in some serious days of detecting old patches in Gold Basin in order to get a solid idea of what I personally missed with the Z14 and give my coils more of a workout. Most of the spots I hit were patches I personally found and I doubt anyone else has ever detected, that way I can gauge what exactly I was passing by and get a good feel for the differences between the coils I have with me.
      However, the first patch I hit was on in Lost Basin proper and not one of my own. I had once met an old timer detecting here as I was exploring back in 2014 and he explained he had found this patch in 2002 and it had produced up to a 1.5 oz'er and about 3-4 ounces in total, mostly deep. It's about 50'x50', seen 3 GPZ's I am aware of, 25" coils, and about 2 decades of detecting.
      I put on the 17x12, which I was given free by the manufacturer, and began a mental gridding. 12 t-hold, low smoothing, 19 gain, HY, Normal. About halfway through I got a very subtle signal, but it was repeatable. I kicked off low smoothing just to hear the difference and the signal was definitely bigger...maybe wider is a better term. Kicking into Difficult the signal disappeared. Back to my normal settings, I boot scraped an inch and saw the top of a large rock which I assumed was the signal, but after pulling it aside with my pick the signal got stronger. I ended up with a solid ~0.3 grammer at about 10 inches. I'm certain this target didn't make a peep on the Z14.

      You can see the big boss man overseeing the operation here to the upper left, and also the old dead twigs which the old timer had at one time raked aside, which was what drew my attention to the area to investigate at first. Grand Wash cliffs in the background, the Grand Canyon is directly behind them. Visible is the foreground is the filled in hole, you can see this is pretty typical Lost Basin reddish dirt. I would classify it as mild to low-medium "heat". Some run Difficult here, but I see no need for it. 

      Here is a video of the lack of sensitivity at the tips of the 17x12. It's really noticable when trying to pinpoint and oddly it makes a big ole 17" round easier to pinpoint with for me than an elliptical. I feel as if the 17x12 is like detecting with a 14x8 except with a lot of extra plastic around the edges and with the depth in the center of the coil of a 17" elliptical. It's odd. I'm not sure it's my choice for rocky washes anymore because that sensitive area towards the center is hard to get over everything.
       
      Next I moved to a wash in Gold Basin which had produced a lot of sub-1 gram stuff for me in the past and I put on the 10" to do some crumbing. I slowed down and really made an effort to listen for tiny blips but after running through about 40 feet of wash bottom without a piece of gold I decided to grab my Gold Bug 2 and run back over the same ground because I swore I should have had some dinks by then. A lot of caliche is exposed here, and for those who don't know what caliche is, it's basically a limestone conglomerate type rock that acts as bedrock in the desert here. It can be soft or hard as concrete.
      Almost immedietely I had a strong signal on the side of the wash, which I assumed must be a small bit of tin. I grabbed the GPZ/10" and despite my best efforts I couldn't get any type of real signal to repeat for me. Going back to the GB2 I recovered the target and it ended up being a 0.03 gram tiny nugget, which upon looking with a loupe was quite porous and had tiny microscopic bits of quartz within it, a very common occurence for nuggets here as much of the gold forms within breccia in shears and shattered fault gouge here so it often encapsulates almost microscopic bits of quartz.

      Due to these non-sluggy sort of targets, the VLF seems to hit much harder on them than the GPZ/10", which probably explains why I can't seem to get the sensitivity on my tiny nuggets as others seem to be reporting, even in other parts of AZ. A 0.1 gram nugget of gold from here might only have 0.05 grams of gold in it, and discontinuous geometry, which is hard on non-VLF machines.
      I moved on another 5 feet and hit another pretty definite target on the GB2, this time it was a paper-thin flake, I think it was about 0.05 grams. Just holding it in my fingers lightly was enough to bend it.  It's at the tip of my pointer finger. It would make a sound on the 10" if I waved it in my scoop right over the coil, but it couldn't hit it at about 1", just too thin even for the GPZ, and that's why I missed it I think. I put my GPZ back in the truck and decided to just run through the last 30 feet or so I had covered with the 10" just out of curiosity.

      I almost immedietely hit another signal, faint but repeatable. At about 6" I pulled out a 0.2 grammer right on caliche. Not sure how I missed this one, might have gone too fast with the 10". It ended up having a lot of quartz too, and some hematite.

      And then another 5 feet again, about 5" and sitting on caliche, a 0.2 grammer that I really should have heard before but somehow didn't. This one I got in-situ before brushing it away as it was wedged in between two cemented pebbles. 

      And then finally a 0.15 grammer that really wasn't even very deep. Not sure why I missed this one but it was right in the center of the small wash and there is no chance my coil didn't scrub it.

      This post got kinda long, so I will take a queue from JW and do a multi-part post. My conclusion (unsurprisingly since we already knew this) is that the target geometry/composition makes a big difference in how successful a person is with the 10" and why I was having trouble understanding why people don't simply just go in with their VLF's instead of the 10X since it's so much quicker and lighter. I know I traded notes with Andy when we first got our 10"' X Coils and he was getting a lot better depth on tiny bits than I was, and I'm sure it's because the gold in the areas he detects is more solid and my gold has a ton more quartz inclusions and porosity. I have some 0.1gram bits that won't make a peep on the 10X even running them directly over the coil in my scoop, and that's due to the target characteristics.
      Overall, I'm reminded why I rarely spend much time doing this kind of detecting unless I really need to get a couple pieces for morale. I don't live close enough to gold fields where I can spend my time chasing small stuff like this. That's just me and my personal situation, but I feel it's necessary to state since the majority of posters here live much closer to detecting ground and might not understand why I detect the ways I do. It's 1000 miles drive each way for me to go detecting and I'm not retired so I have to make it pay or at least break even. Next post I'll show you what I normally aim for in my personal detecting and why I do it that way even though it breaks some of the "golden rules" of gold detecting. I believe it will be important to make these distinctions for those new people reading these sorts of posts 5, 10, 15 years down the road and wondering why we did what we did. I feel it's important to not copy what others do online, but to develop a strategy and skillset that matches your local conditions and personal situations. My style probably might not even be optimum 150 miles away in the Bradshaws, let alone across the country or world. 
       
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