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I love Mercs -- they always make me feel good (better than a Roosie, but I like those, too, as long as silver).

Could you squeeze out date & mintmark on the Buffie?

 

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The value thing looks like it is for water. Great mercury dime, I have not found of or those yet.

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The buffie was toast, not a mark to be had. Was hoping for a partial date but nothing.

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Great finds and the merc look great shape.

Good luck on your next hunt.

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As I am not an American, I wonder what a Mercury Dime history wasNow I know.....

The Mercury Dime is also commonly referred to as the Winged Liberty Head Dime and was designed by Adolph Weinman. The coin got its common name from its reverse depiction of a young Liberty which was confused with the Roman god Mercury.

Mercury dimes are very popular ten-cent pieces produced by the United States Mint from 1916 to 1945. This dime is composed of 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper. The coin contains a total of just over .072 troy ounces of silver.

The word dime comes from the Old French disme (now dîme), meaning "tithe" or "tenth part"

I hope this helps us foreigners. 

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Good, concise description.  Wikipedia is great for these kinds of details.  Values and pretty pictures can be found here.  Keep in mind that PCGS is a professional grading service.  They grade, document, and seal the coin for a not-so-minimal cost.  Their prices are retail, *after* that process.  There are other similar services but NGC is the other big one here in the USA.  Here is a photo of one of each:

slabbed.thumb.jpg.33e588716d5407e785336acccb040b15.jpg

If you want more realistic prices, Ebay completed auctions give a much better indication.  (And another warning -- coins that came from the ground are going to have less value on the market due to condition issues, including off-coloring.  Cleaning may or may not help but it won't restore the coin to typical circulation conditions, which are more desirable to collectors.)

BTW, as usual my posts tend to give information for many readers, not just the poster above.  Geof, you may well know all of this, but some others probably don't.

 

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A friend uses a drop of some acid concoction to reveal dates on buffaloes. There are also some YT videos. [It does work— he's cleaned up a couple of buffs I detected.] Collectors don't like it, so don't use it on anything of numismatic value! (Just ignore me if you already know this.)

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