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I could use some advice from the true adventurers out there. I have used a regular backpack for the past 4 years and it has gone with me all over the West (and even in the Amazon jungles of Brazil) on my detecting adventures. Inside I carry food, water, first aid, extra coil, TP, and other essentials. I have strapped sleeping bags and gold pans to the outside. I have it ready to go for at least one or two nights sleeping in mild weather. But the miles have taken their toll.

For those of you who venture far from your vehicle into the bush, I would like to know what kind of pack you use. Pics and advice are welcome. I am looking for something that can carry 1-2 gallons of water, a sleeping bag, battery bank, possibly the ability to strap my detector and pick to it for long hikes, and either waterproof or with a rain cover. Price is not important. I have an old frame pack I could use but it is gigantic.

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I use a 70 litre trekking backpack. Slim and tall. Its aussie brand Mountains Designs tramper70. The main thing is to have a super thick angled waist mount and lower back pad so all weight is easily kept only on hips(no shoulder weight). The staps can moved up and down pack body to suit. All gear is in the main pack body in waterproof softsacks and it has a bungy net and one small Pocket but has straps if you want to strap on a complete wand or shaft and coil.

my pack is reasonably heavy cordura, it takes a bashing for life, but does weigh a bit.

Better to have pack where all gear is in. Hanging gear off sides/back is fatiguing. Get a slightly bigger pack then you normally use and you can easily fold in top when not carrying much gear.

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"I am looking for something that can carry 1-2 gallons of water, a sleeping bag, battery bank,...."  

If water is available a good water treatment system can reduce weight considerably. 

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2 hours ago, geof_junk said:

If water is available a good water treatment system can reduce weight considerably. 

A few areas have semi-clean water so I can either drink it straight or add iodine if I’m not feeling like Rambo. But many are dry or have extremely gross water. I have found that when the temperature is over 95 I can go through about 2 gallons per day - depending on how many holes I dig and how deep. But still a great idea to keep the treatment in the pack, very small and lightweight.

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3 hours ago, RedDirtDigger said:

I use a 70 litre trekking backpack. Slim and tall. Its aussie brand Mountains Designs tramper70. The main thing is to have a super thick angled waist mount and lower back pad so all weight is easily kept only on hips(no shoulder weight). The staps can moved up and down pack body to suit. All gear is in the main pack body in waterproof softsacks and it has a bungy net and one small Pocket but has straps if you want to strap on a complete wand or shaft and coil.

my pack is reasonably heavy cordura, it takes a bashing for life, but does weigh a bit.

Better to have pack where all gear is in. Hanging gear off sides/back is fatiguing. Get a slightly bigger pack then you normally use and you can easily fold in top when not carrying much gear.

I have been looking into these. My current pack is all on my shoulders and can weigh around 30lbs on longer trips. A frame pack is a good idea.

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My wife has a 75 lt MacPac backpack NZ made. I have a 85 lt Paddy Pallion Aust made. When we did  ....Tasmania's OverLand Track....  in the late 1990's self reliant for the two of us.. I started with 42 kilos (over 90 lb) at the start of the trip. As it was a good design and fitted I had no trouble with the 6 day hike in mountain terrain that had snow and hot heat condition (four seasons a day). If you get a backpack of a similar design that fits well you will find it worth the money.   

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I'm thinking I need to have a lookout for the perfect detecting backpack, I need something big but light, no fancy features, I couldn't care less about carrying water, we just get the nice fresh stuff from the creeks/rivers here, tastes better than any bottled water so I often just take an empty drink bottle. 

My biggest issue is fitting my GPZ, QED or GPX along with a VLF along with my pick another coil size and some food 🙂   I should venture into a Macpac store and have a look at the current lineup, I've not been in one for 10+ years.  It must suck to make products that last as you just don't get the sales of something disposable.

I currently have a Macpac which I've had about 15 years and it's still going strong that I use for my detecting.  I have a smaller Macpac I've had since I was at school as my school bag and it's still in great condition too so that sucker is old,  I use sometimes, it doesn't fit the detectors or pick but I take it on missions up the creeks with my lunch and stuff in it, it keeps stuff inside it dry even if it gets very wet.

I like products made by people who have a need for the product and it fills their need so they start up some business selling it, not people who are out to make money from the start.  A product designed by someone who is filling their own need is something that makes my ears prick up, its why X-coils exist, it's also why Macpac exists, this video on how they started is pretty cool, they're simple but do the job and just last, they're tough.

 

 

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Thanks for the vid,

Looks like great gear! Are you just going to get one of their's? Looks like they last! Here's a few others!👍👍

20200915_051137.jpg

20200915_051010.jpg

20200915_050936.jpg

20200915_050914.jpg

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Are you going to wear it all day detecting or just leave it in "camp" as an anchor point?    If you are going to leave it in "camp" then any well made good size internal frame will work, but then you'll need a second one for travel away from camp.   A good utility belt and a light weight day pack with a 'camel back' might be a better answer.   I guess it depends on how much stuff you need to be happy. 

Water filtration systems are a must though.  They are fairly cheap and small while water is heavy (8.3 pounds per gallon) and large and often in fragile carriers to boot.  When I'm having to backpack water I prefer to carry water in 2 liter coke bottles.  They are easier to store full or empty and are tough enough to survive drops and falls.  

HH
Mike

 

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