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Not trying to put the boot in Reg as I see there been a few responses to your post but some of the things you’ve said are just plain wrong and need correcting. The GPZ housing is based on the CTX

Ah, more controls implies sophistication does it? And simplicity of operation must reflect on the mental capabilities of the operator? Just simple folks really, not nearly so smart as you, are they Re

Yes Reg.  John gave up the gold not long after the belated release of the Minelab SD2000. He was the principal Minelab prototype tester here for many years. Took to teaching detecting lessons for awhi

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If consumers just happily gobble up poorly designed machinery without complaint, then that is what will proliferate. Sure the detectors in question have some desirable features, but that does not excuse the lazy aspect of much of the design. If a company has little or no competition it will tend to produce a product that is convenient for themselves rather than being ideal for the consumer, who, if they tend to fawn all over such offerings, simply encourage the manufacturer to continue a less than desirable practice.

If the automobile industry behaved in the same way the Ford Edsell would still be in production.

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I’ll give you this Reg - you are persistent.

Several folks have explained how the SDC met their needs well - did the “job to be done”.

Your criticism seems to be mostly based on MInelab’s failure to design exactly the machine you want for the job you have “to be done”. 

That leads me to wonder what job you think everybody should be doing so that the detector (which apparently doesn’t exist) would meet the multitude of needs that gold seekers - most of them far away from your own Australia - would be met PERFECTLY by a detector which Minelab is not making.

I have been often “taken to the woodshed” publicly and privately by our host - Steve about my long standing dislike for MInelab’s marketing - guess what - I just shelled out hard cash for an SDC. 

Why, because it fits a “job to be done” that I have.

For those who may be interested, here’s an introduction to “Jobs to be Done” theory.

https://www.christenseninstitute.org/key-concepts/jobs-to-be-done/

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1 hour ago, Rick Kempf said:

That leads me to wonder what job you think everybody should be doing so that the detector (which apparently doesn’t exist) would meet the multitude of needs that gold seekers - most of them far away from your own Australia - would be met PERFECTLY by a detector which Minelab is not making.

I think Fisher already know the answer to this one which is weight and ergonomics, this is already evident with the Impulse AQ being a nice lightweight design and with any luck the Impulse Gold 🙂  Coil choice is also a big one which already they're finding out with the Impulse, people want coil sizes that don't exist already and it's not even properly on the market yet.

Gold machines tend to be heavy cumbersome things, They mostly all perform very well and I'd say most owners are happy with the performance of their machine, you don't often hear owners of any of these gold machines complaining about the performance, it's always about cosmetics and weight more than anything, the odd lack of features complaint like me with my wishing for built in speakers on all of them and more coil choices is another common one.

I'm happy with the performance of my QED, GPX and GPZ.  I don't have complaints in that department for any of them, the things I don't like are mostly design issues like the weight or the poor performance of the wireless audio or the EMI handling, no internal speaker and so on.  I doubt many SDC owners are upset with it's performance either, if it came as two models one with a normal detector design even if not waterproof contained a llighter housing without the wonky coil I am sure there would be a lot of potential happy buyers and it would likely outsell the original design significantly in future sales if people had the choice between the two models.  

If the GPX 6000 is indeed an SDC2300 and GPX combined in a more traditional detector housing with improved wireless audio and a bit lighter I am sure Minelab will have a hit on their hands.  I get fatigue swinging a heavy detector and I'm quite young still, I can't imagine how bad it must be as age kicks in which seems to be a big part of the detector customer base.  Inventions like the hip stick as good as they may be are really just users compensating for the weight of the detector out of necessity.

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4 hours ago, phrunt said:

If the GPX 6000 is indeed an SDC2300 and GPX combined in a more traditional detector housing with improved wireless audio and a bit lighter I am sure Minelab will have a hit on their hands.  

Maybe if it's $999. We have to start expecting more. That's basically just 2 old machines wrapped into a new box. Otherwise we end up with the US model of "same machine, new box" and a detector dark ages in AUS too.

If the 6000 doesn't have some significant improvements or new performance features well beyond wireless and slight weight reduction, and the machine is priced above $2000, I will begin questioning the future direction of Minelab consumer gold detectors.

It makes me wonder if the planned successor to the GPZ is just going to be a GPZ/GPX hybrid. Suppose you could run the TX loop in the DOD as a mono TX/RX for the GPX side of things. Benefit being salt mitigation and nothing much else I guess.

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3 hours ago, jasong said:

Otherwise we end up with the US model of "same machine, new box" and a detector dark ages in AUS too.

If the 6000 doesn't have some significant improvements or new performance features well beyond wireless and slight weight reduction, and the machine is priced above $2000, I will begin questioning the future direction of Minelab consumer gold detectors.

Paint jobs have kept Fisher alive for 10+ years now 😛

I don't know what significant improvement they could do and keep its performance below the GPZ as they've already said it's staying the flagship with the GPX 6000 below it.  That's why I keep thinking it's going to be more modern features and ergonomics, a more modern design not so much a Fisher paint job and more of a complete rebuild using modern technology, lets face it the GPX looks like an old Whites big box detector and lacks modern features like wireless audio.   A mix of the SDC and GPX should be better at picking up nuggets the GPX is weak on which might be a selling point.  I guess we'll have to wait and see but I am thinking your expectations are unfortunately too optimistic.

I guess it depends more on what they'll get away with selling to their main markets like the African market.

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Rick Kempf, I take on board your remarks about 'the job to be done'. Quite right. I guess my 'job to be done' differs from yours. I reflect on the remarks of John Hider-Smith, the best detector operator that I ever met. "Oh, that's the sort of gold you want to find?"

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I'll post this up for Gerry.  I hope you find something like this Rick.

 

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8 hours ago, phrunt said:

I don't know what significant improvement they could do and keep its performance below the GPZ as they've already said it's staying the flagship with the GPX 6000 below it. 

It doesn't have to be about having less performance apples to apples, but different performance that you can't find on the other machine because the technology is different. What does PI do better than ZVT? There is the likely answer.

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