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Why Didn't Minelab Think About It?


Xergix

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I don't know which site these photos were taken from, I don't know if you have already seen them, I must say Ukrainian technicians are really good at modifying metal detectors, but my question is why ML didn't think of such a thing ?
Single keyboard for all commands, no mechanical keys that can break easily, all  reach of your thumb finger, simple!

nox ls02.jpg

Edited by Xergix
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A few weeks ago I was going to start a thread about the Equinox keypad and menu, but I decided I do too much complaining about an otherwise excellent detector.  Still, I'm glad you (and especially the techs/modders) stepped up.  Where can I get one?  😁

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21 hours ago, phrunt said:

I do like that design better than the real Equinox design, I don't like the side buttons, the power button isn't easy to use either, especially with a detector cover on, sometimes I feel I press it 3 or so times before it works.

I used to have problems with the power button also.  Sometimes it would take 4 or 5 tries.  I thought I was going to have to send it back to minelab.  Then one day I tried a firm press and held it for just a half second or so.  Once I started doing that very quick momentary hold I’ve never had a problem again.  I also have a deanos protective cover on mine.  

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Just my 2😁😁😁 cents its easy to modify than to create from scratch ,peeps were complaining about the Deus buttons as well not high enough.......they used to and probably still stick those raised buttons

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/i/123824045417?chn=ps

 

RR

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I do not like the Equinox on/off side button either . It tends to autoactivate or even reset the detector when it is in a rucksack. Hopefully ML has changed this design on the Vanquish ...  🙂

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I think the technical reason may come down, in part, to the difference between membrane switches and proper metal-on-metal switches. A proper switch will have a very low resistance, under 1 Ohm, unless it's worn out. Membrane switches vary, some have carbon graphite coatings on the contact faces, and several hundred Ohms can be normal. These are acceptable values if they are being 'read' by a microprocessor, or other low-power circuitry, but may be unsuitable for such things as the Power-on function. Membrane switch panels are normally wired in a 'grid' pattern, with, for example 4 top-layer wires and 4 bottom-layer wires, giving a possible 16 switches, with only 8 wires. Fine when a microprocessor is reading them, but for a Power-on function, two seperate wires are needed.
It's likely that only two proper switches are really needed on the machine. The backlight on/off function and the user memory could go straight to a micro.

[ I'm puzzled by the decision to have 3 buttons on the 600 model, it makes no sense having two different rubber mouldings, and the switch itself is a 10 cent item. They should've made them both 4 switch, and just used the 4th switch for some trivial function on the 600, like 'Backlight Off' or 'Hi/Lo brightness'. ]

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A lot of current does not have to pass through an on / off key, there is always an interface that manages the power.
Maybe whoever designed the Nox thought it was a smartphone with power and volume buttons, LOL. The state of art in electronics says another thing.

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Re: the current. If you don't pass an adequate current through a switch, they can build up an insulating oxide layer, and stop switching. It's known as "wetting current", thankfully this Wiki article saves me the explanation:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wetting_current


There are techniques to get around it, of course. Using gold-plated contacts will help. Making the switch have a sliding action, rather than a flat touching action can be useful. Using a charged-up capacitor in the switching circuitry so there's a short pulse of higher current when the switch closes is a common technique. These methods all favour a proper switch mechanism.

Then there's ergonomics: they perhaps didn't want the 'dashboard' cluttered up with buttons that rarely get pressed, like the On/Off , and the Backlight. Perhaps they didn't like the idea of the On/Off function being easily pressed by accident, so placed it way away from the others? Perhaps they didn't want to make the control box any wider, for aesthetic reasons, nor taller for packing compactness ?
I'm glad the Backlight On/Off isn't with the other membrane buttons. When I'm detecting "low key" , I sure don't want a huge white flashlight coming on unintentionally.
I also own a Fisher F2, and have on occasions inadvertently pressed the Power button (on the front panel membrane ) and have wandered around for a few minutes not getting any targets, only to discover why, to my great annoyance.
 

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