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  • mn90403 changed the title to 4 Hours To A Little (.07g) Gold!

Those pictures bring back many memories and all of them are good ones!

                                                                                              Norm

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"About 1 am I headed to Arizona." Folks, as I have mentioned before, Mitchel is a phenomenon when it comes to driving long distances during the night. I think he needs to make business cards which say "Have Detector - will Travel - Anywhere, Anytime."

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41 minutes ago, Jim McCulloch said:

"About 1 am I headed to Arizona." Folks, as I have mentioned before, Mitchel is a phenomenon when it comes to driving long distances during the night. I think he needs to make business cards which say "Have Detector - will Travel - Anywhere, Anytime."

Jim,

I need to come back your way sometime soon and get the stink off from there!

Mitchel

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2 hours ago, normmcq said:

Those pictures bring back many memories and all of them are good ones!

                                                                                              Norm

Norm,

It is very, very dry this year because of the la Nina.  All the moisture tracks that come up through Mexico to the deserts are staying east this year and making hurricanes.  The vegetation is dry and even some of the big cactus couldn't survive.  

It may be easier to get to some of the more difficult washes or under previously green bushes.  I could push them over with my boots.

Mitchel

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Mitchel,  Buddy if we lived closer, I'd be out there with you.  I get those silly thoughts on occasion and something just keeps pocking at me to go do it.  Much of the time it is just to get out and nothing gets found, but on occasion those pokes to go, actually do put me on the gold. 

I've done well along the freeway near Dome Rock.

Nice story, pics and yes you got gold.

 

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It's not the size that counts, it's how you tell the story.  That sure was a mission, I whinge about driving two hours to find gold, in fact that's about the biggest distance I've driven in pursuit of the yellow stuff averaging an hour drive.

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50 minutes ago, phrunt said:

It's not the size that counts, it's how you tell the story.  That sure was a mission, I whinge about driving two hours to find gold, in fact that's about the biggest distance I've driven in pursuit of the yellow stuff averaging an hour drive.

Simon,

This trip I passed by two gold fields on the way to Quartzsite.  One I've found gold and the other I haven't.  Both of them have a long off road drive after you leave the highway.  Sunday I didn't want to deal with that and just fly along at 80 mph when I could.

Time for you to look at a map and sneak off without JW or ask those dealers you know where you should go.  They have other clients who find gold and they want you to find gold too.  A good dealer is a source of information.

As a matter of fact I called Gerry up one time when I was at Rye Patch.  I had looked at his web pages but I was not a customer.  I called him and he told me some good information.  It was 2-3 years later before I took lessons from him.  I owed him. (I don't think I ever told him that story.)

He'll get more of my business.

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We are now coming into spring and summer, skiing is over for the season now.  I intend to gold detect quite a bit more this year than last, I'm really happy with my equipment now, I'm well armed to find some gold and I'm going to use bigger coils to try find some new ground rather than using my little coils to clean up missed crumbs from old throw out piles and so on...

It seems like a 4 hour drive maximum radius of home is about as far as gold country goes without heading right up to the top west of the island but it's rugged wild bushy terrain not like the arid dry areas I'm used to.

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