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Need Information About A Pulse Induction Purchase Decision!


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I currently use a Equinox 800 and I consider myself to know absolutely everything about it. There really isnt anything that anyone can tell me about that machine that i havent mastered and completely already know. Its probably the most simple machine to use on the planet. I understand all the settings and I even know how to exploit the machine to get the results that i want when i want and i know how to get the maximum depth possible on the machine. I can even get a 22 inch air test on a silver quarter. Not too many people know how to do that and it is very relevant when you hunt in places with fill dirt and sand. 

So I have been completely cleaning out all double beeps, every single piece of trash, every sliver of aluminum foil, every rusty nail, Every single pull tab, piece of a pull tab, tip of a pull tab, chocolate coin discarded foil etc etc etc.  Some of these places i have been electronically sifting wont even give a double beep on ANYTHING anymore with the Equinox 800. I dont care about VDI i just dig it all at this point. I try to force out double beeps. It just doesnt happen anymore in these places ive been pounding. Ive used all 8 modes with several different settings and I now consider these places PRIME PROPERTY for a Pulse Induction Machine in order to find more targets.  These places are so clean that I wont even have to tug around the 800 to cross check the beeps because the 800 cant hit anything else there anyway.

So i need advice on a purchase. We all know Whites has ended production. But ive always been interested in the TDI pulse machine. Right now you can pick up the Whites TDI Metal Detector with 12” Waterproof Spider Search Coil & Bundle for about 999.95 plus tax and shipping.  I have read some old reviews of this machine and some people claim that this thing is an absolute beast at the beach. Ive seen videos of people making water proof boxes and tying it to there body just so they tug this thing along the water and get that unbeatable depth with it. Some of these guys are claiming they get about 3 foot of depth with it while wearing ear phones.  I find that very interesting but i dont plan on using it at the beach. 

I need a machine strictly for coin/relic and jewelry hunting AT THE PARKS and other places on Dry land That the equinox 800 just cant find any more targets at, even after 2 weeks of straight rain. 

I think my max in depth dig on the ground with the 800 was about a 12 inch Large Cent, and it was basically on a hillside. 

So i cant find any information about the depth of coins that the WHites TDI can detect.  I have Trimes in neighborhood and half dimes too. The equinox will struggle to find those targets that have been in the ground for over a 100 years at about 6 to 7 inches. Can a TDI pull those targets at 12 inches if they have been in the ground for over a hundred years? Whites has taken down their forums and i cant find any relevant information about coin hunting with the machine. Why is TDI cheaper than a V3I? I know that my 800 is superior to the V3I because i used to own one. The V3I is just a VLF machine. If the TDI is a Pulse machine should'nt the detectable depth for coins/jewelry/relics be better and deeper than a VLF?

I dont want to dump a grand on a machine with 10 year old technology if my VLF is going to be superior to it. I really don't want to buy a Garret ATX with its 8 year old technology for 2 grand, when i can probably wait until Minelab releases this GPX 6000 specs information. Thats probably when you can get a good deal on a used GPX 5000 for 2 grand or less on ebay.

USED GPX 5000 > Garret ATX at that price point.    But if a TDI is all need, THat would save me a grand. I dont care about going to gold fields and looking for gold flakes or nuggets. I care about digging up the history where i live at. I could get just as lucky in my village and dig up a silver coin worth $50,000 or more as you could get lucky finding a gold nugget of the same value in the dessert or mountains, RISKING YOUR LIFE FOR IT... Ive read that a Garret ATX and the Whites TDI perform about the same as far as depth of coins is concerned. So I guess i have 2 options, A whites TDI for 1 grand, or wait and try to get a USED GPX 5000 when they go on sale after the GPX 6000 specs release.

Is a TDI going to be sufficient for my needs? THanks!

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20 minutes ago, larryw said:

Whites has taken down their forums and i cant find any relevant information about coin hunting with the machine.

https://www.detectorprospector.com/magazine/steves-guides/steves-guide-whites-tdi-coin-settings/

Long story short, the GPX outperforms a TDI. The TDI tech is more like 20 years old, being a fairly direct copy of the Eric Foster Goldscan 5. White's licensed the machine from Eric, and if anything White's watered the machine down over time.

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From what I heard is an ATX can pick up a dime at 12" with the DD coil. I can't imagine it would pick up a trime at that depth.

Trimes are really thin and small, their TID's are usually much lower and close to the square tab range. Ones that I found weren't all that deep just a few inches down. Found one earlier this year with my AT Pro and one just a month ago with my Gold Racer. They are easy to miss even if you think your digging all targets, very easy to skip over.

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Larry,

  That's a bold statement that you have mastered everything that the Nox can offer! But i will take you at your word! Be prepared for many questions from people like me that take longer to master such things! I would definitely like to benefit from your knowledge of the Nox! 

Good luck with your PI dilemma!👍👍

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Steve Herschbach has an excellent article for coin hunting with a TDI:  Steves Guide Whites TDI Coin Settings

I use a TDI, not the the TDI SL for older coin hunting in my local parks. The ground in my area is very mineralize and a VLF detector has a hard time detecting anything beyond six inches. I cherry pick the signals I get and only dig the deep targets. What I mean by this is the target sound is modulated, if the target is close the signal is loud, target signal further away will be quieter. If the GB is setup correctly and high conductors setting is used, your Indian Heads, Wheaties, Silver coins will be detected while most trash is ignored. You will not pickup foil or bottle caps, but deep wire and nails will sound good. A video that the late Reg Sniff who was involved with the design of the TDI will give you a better understanding on how the GB control works on discriminating out different targets. Reg Sniff Video

I takes awhile to master the capabilities of the TDI, but I've had very rewarding results. If you decide on getting a TDI, in my opinion get a TDI, not a TDI SL.

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Very good video. My quesiton is if you gb out nickels and square tabs I think you will lose trimes as the register close to those targets. Other coins in that period like flying eagle cents and the small gold coins would be lost too.

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On 10/15/2020 at 8:34 PM, larryw said:

 I can even get a 22 inch air test on a silver quarter. Not too many people know how to do that and it is very relevant when you hunt in places with fill dirt and sand. 

 

Hey, I'll be the first to ask...how did you get it to do that?  

Thanks

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On 10/16/2020 at 1:34 AM, larryw said:

I currently use a Equinox 800 and I consider myself to know absolutely everything about it.

As the machine only has one physical recovery speed(3), I would like to know why increasing the recovery speed setting reduces depth when all that is happening is that the machine is clipping the audio as you go up the scale?

 

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On 10/15/2020 at 8:34 PM, larryw said:

I currently use a Equinox 800 and I consider myself to know absolutely everything about it. There really isnt anything that anyone can tell me about that machine that i havent mastered and completely already know. Its probably the most simple machine to use on the planet. I understand all the settings and I even know how to exploit the machine to get the results that i want when i want and i know how to get the maximum depth possible on the machine. I can even get a 22 inch air test on a silver quarter. Not too many people know how to do that and it is very relevant when you hunt in places with fill dirt and sand. 

Wow, I can't begin tell you just how impressive that all sounds.  Shouldn't we be the ones who are asking the questions then?  :smile:

Since it seems you got your TDI question answered I'll pile on dragging us off topic...I too want know just how you managed to setup the Nox to get that kind "depth" on that quarter?  You can't possibly tease that without sharing at least a snippet of your vast Equinox knowledge with us.  I'm a slow learner, still picking up things nearly 3 years after getting the Equinox.  Would love to learn more from someone who has completely mastered it.  So throw us a bone...

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2 hours ago, Sandheron said:

As the machine only has one physical recovery speed(3), I would like to know why increasing the recovery speed setting reduces depth when all that is happening is that the machine is clipping the audio as you go up the scale?

 

Read this...to your point, the depth reduction at higher recovery speeds is not really that significant...

 

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