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Any of you coin collectors that can tell me maybe what type of error this is called and what it might be worth? It is a 2006 Nevada Quarter but it appears it was never struck with the reeds on the edges it has very high lip on both sides and measures 1mm smaller diameter than it should but weighs exactly 5.66 grams as it should. Its clearly not worn just not stamped correctly. I googled and couldnt find anything similar.

 

edge1.jpg

edge2.jpg

reverse.jpg

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It might have been ground off. Think the reeded edges are in the die so my guess for that to not to have a reeded edge at all the planchard would have to be so under sized it might be out of round.

Can you see any grind marks on the edge?

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I don't think it could be ground off because it weighs exactly 5.66 grams still which is exactly what a quarter is supposed to weigh so it hasn't lost any metal.

I did find on google examples of what they call dryer coins, coins that got stuck on outside of dryer drum in landromats rolling around and rounding the edges but those examples looked a lot more rounded on the edges? not squared

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Check the diameter and thickness.  If it was broad struck (i.e. without the retaining collar that provides the reeded edge and keeps the planchet from spreading during the strike), then the diameter will be greater than 24.3 mm/0.955 inch and it will be less than 1.75 mm/.069 inch thick.  If it is not wider and thinner than a normal quarter then the reeds were removed somehow after it left the mint.

If it is a broastruck error then it coukd be worth $10 to $15 depending on the condition of the quarter.

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If that were done after it left the mint it was a professional (machine shop) job -- not impossible.  I would have expected some signs on the faces that showed the coin was firmly held, though.  In addition, that might give a sharper raised edge which the photo doesn't seem to show.

Sometimes the USA mints strike coins for other countries.  It's a longshot (but many mint errors are just that), however a possible(?) scenario is that the collar for one of those foreign coin jobs was accidentally used in the press that was minting USA quarters.

You appear to have done some internet research.  You have a much better chance posting to an internet forum which specializes in error coins than here.

Value?  That's tough, even if it turns out to be a genuine mint error.  The economics law of supply and demand requires demand, and error coin collecting is a specialty with a limited number of followers (compared to general numismatics).  Often there has to be general concensus that grows value.  Die errors (like double die coins) have a rabid following but mint errors that occur because of mistakes in the striking process -- not as much.  Ironically sometimes the rarest occurrences have little value because there aren't enough examples to spark the community's interest.

"It's worth what someone is willing to pay" is one of those seemingly unhelpful cliches, but always true.  When collectors are few and far between that is about the best that can be done.  If you can document the error pocess and advertise on Ebay (with documentation) you'll get your best current price.  But that's a ways down the road.

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Not my area of knowledge but I gotta wonder if the pressure of the press was off on that one and it did not strike hard enough , or maybe long enough, to press the metal into the reeds.  Interesting that the faces have a good relief even without the spread.

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Cool find 57',

 Did you find that in pocket change, or detecting? The boy's have it covered pretty well i think, with what they said! But good eye on your part! Good luck with finding the explanation!👍👍

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That  is interesting.   Makes me want to look through my quarter clad and see if I have any like that.    If there are more than one sample then there may be the makings of a mystery.

HH
Mike

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Isn't the reeded edge done in the same strike? Under struck you would see some form of a seem between the dies.

If the reeded edge is one after the die strike then maybe that process was skipped.

Wouldn't be that hard to machine off an edge using bull noses on the head stock and tail stock. Even a hard rubber would hold it in place enough to zip the edges off.

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I found it detecting in a park.

I tracked down a coin page where they were showing examples of coins stuck in commercial dryers between the two drum skins rolling around till it rolled the edges. So its possible thats what it is what they call a dryer coin. I just found it interesting that it weighed 5.66 grams which means it has not lost any material but it maybe could have compressed it turning between two drums which is why it is 1mm smaller than it should but still weighs the same.

So maybe it is just post mint damage, sure looked interesting though. I'll probably put it into one of my books of odd coins where it will sit for the next few decades lol I'm new to coin collecting, metal detecting kind of got me into collecting now

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