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It's a made up name which is a mash up of the words Quick, Bungee and Double (double adjustment point).  It describes another innovative product from Doc that makes detecting more enjoyable and helps save your arm, shoulder neck and back from undue stress.  Just add your own backpack or Hydration pack.

This amazing Bungee Support System provides absolutely instantaneous adjustment so your detector is always at the proper height off the ground, even when you are in mid-swing.

We use super strong Marine Grade bungee that is stronger than 3/8ths inch bungee that is commonly used for tie-downs.

 

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  • Similar Content

    • By zortan
      Could someone who has one of these please tell me how long the bungee is?
      I’m wanting to find a bungee in the states that has enough length to attach it to the lower shaft of the GPZ 7000.  I’ve seen that this is how some of the ozzies are holding up the 19” coil and would like to try this.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks guys!
    • By billdean
      I have been searching this site as well as others for one simple question and can't seem to find the answer. Will this harness fit fat guys. I mean I am 5'11 and 275 pounds. Will the hip straps adjust enough for us bigger guys? I would like to buy one as my arm has been taken a beating.
    • By DDancer
      Its a silly question but I am curious to know how many use a bungee or other support system while out bush or even in a park?
       
      I use just a standard harness and bungee pretty exclusively as it reduces wear and tear on my person   The advent of the Zed kinda makes it imperative to me now.   I gain extra control of my coil, regardless of the machine, and I don't have to worry about dropping it to take a break~ or that someone will try to grab and run with it. 
      Silly question but I'm curious to ask.
    • By fredmason
      I tried a couple of methods to balance and hang the detector from my harness and hipstick. These pics show clearly how I did it. Attaching the bottom of Doc's bungy on the right and then bringing the top connector through a d-ring on the left does a few things. This attachment helps eleviate some of the twist that the detector wants to do, it keeps the bungy in line for maximum lift and control, you can turn the detector loose and it won't fall to the ground and it makes swinging the detector very easy on worn-out wrists and elbows. Also, it keeps the bungy up and away from my fairly large hands...comfort and convenience thanks to the Hip-stick, Doc's Bungy and a little modification by me...
      fred
       
       



    • By normmcq
      Not ever been a user of a heavy detector, I didn't have to use any support system but wished I had when using a large coil. Now with the ZED I can't detect with out a bungee being attached to a harness or a Hip Stick. Even a bungee has a learning curve. The habit that I got into was to disconnect it from the machine, as it was always out of the way and I could grab the eye and attach it to the detector with out looking. One problem, I didn't always get the right end, then reversing it and readjusting it was taking away from detecting time. My cure, take some electrical tape and close the adjusting end of the bungee.                                                                                  Norm
    • By karelian
      If memory serve me correctly as a 17 year old I found myself swinging a Garrett A2B in one arm, the other arm holding a pick over my shoulder. No hat, no water, not GPS, just enthusiasm.
      Those days are long gone, getting back into electronic prospecting I found myself using a sling bag, it held water, gps, phone and a 5w handheld radio. A small pick hung off it and until I got myself a larger pick it was adequate. Problem was that I always had a reason to return to the car for something, which ate away at my swing time. I needed to equip myself so that I could operate for hours without needing to return to the vehicle. The addition of a decent size pick forced me to adopt a rig that allowed a large degree of independence. A molle battle belt and suspenders combined with a heavy duty leather belt formed the basis of my prospecting rig. A leather holster for the large pick, first aid kit, two way radio, GPS, phone, water bladder and water bottle, etc. I can simply add or detract as circumstances dictate. In remote areas I have a Personal Locator Beacon and additional safety gear, at other times an Ipad and phone replace the PLB. Snake first aid kit at all times, one in the car and one as part of the permanent first aid kit on the rig. I always leave trip information and details with family before going out, keep my first aid training up to date and maintain my gear, with particular care for keeping the car up to spec at all times.. 
      I can now go out detecting without needing to return to the vehicle for a whole day.  No more time wasting going back and forth, more swing time results.. safety and convenience.
      Pays to keep the gear mounted on the rear panels of the belt away from the front, less interaction between the detector and stuff. Easier to bend and dig. The water bladder carries 2 litres of water with ice cubes to keep it cool all day. The weight goes unnoticed and the pick is back far enough to not interfere with the detector. Set the rig up correctly and balance your load, the weigh disappears..
      The rig in the pictures is my second attempt using a better battle belt and harness. Easier to thread the leather in and out between molle panels to hold the leather pick holder. 
      Because of this rig I tend to wander off further and further, making the GPS and a map even more essential. The GPS to mark the location of the vehicle and to mark interesting locations, the topographic and geological map allows trip planning on the go.
      All a far cry from the 17 year old swinging the Garrett A2B with nothing but a pick.. All the best, Karelian.
       
       




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