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Great story and nice gold. I have not yet been detecting for gold yet, but am learning my 800 to be able to go myself someday.

Be patient and good things will happen when you least expect it to.

I have found several ounces with my grandfather when we were sluicing along a couple of creeks, but never have used a detector.

Good luck on your next hunt.

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Welcome GoldTree,

   Very good story and finds! That sound's as much like an AA introduction, as I've ever heard!🤣  Since you are new here, please post an intro in the Meet & Greet section of the forum! And tell us where your from, and other pertinent information!

    You have landed in the right place for great info!👍👍

 

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My finds for the total of this year! At least I got out 3 times...

20201022_191817.jpg

20200925_180749.jpg

20201003_104302.jpg

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Very nice finds for sure. I have yet to find any nuggets, but know in time it will happen.

Good luck on your next hunt!

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On 11/15/2020 at 9:46 PM, Joe D. said:

Welcome GoldTree,

   Very good story and finds! That sound's as much like an AA introduction, as I've ever heard!🤣  ...

 

That’s what I was going for!!! 😂

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I wonder why is it people detect here and there and just find one nugget here and another there.  

Could it be you walking away from a large gold deposit that is just too deep for a metal detector find it. ??  

Im aware that where you have found gold there is always more to be found.  

I dont believe finding a nugget or two be called a Gold Deposit. 

 

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1 hour ago, principedeleon said:

I wonder why is it people detect here and there and just find one nugget here and another there.  

Could it be you walking away from a large gold deposit that is just too deep for a metal detector find it. ??  

Im aware that where you have found gold there is always more to be found.  

I dont believe finding a nugget or two be called a Gold Deposit. 

 

Hello!

The area I found these two nuggets in is actually a known and producing patch that I have been exploring and observing. I personally have found just over 10 nuggets from this deposit ranging from multi-gram to sub-gram, and I am also aware of a few other detectorists who have pulled many nuggets from the very same location. 

However! I am not completely convinced yet as to what type of deposit this may be... Sometimes the gold and the ground suggest it is a high and dry ancient channel that has been concentrated over time on this hilltop and in a nearby gulch. But other times the gold alone says it isn't far from its original source. Maybe it's both!!! I have yet to completely explore the possibility of a nugget producing lode on this hill of mine because there is plenty of placer for me to exploit currently. Between detecting and drywashing, I can assure you this is absolutely a Gold Deposit! 

Like I said originally though, I have much exploration still to do! 3 acres can sound relatively small, but when trying to thoroughly explore a very remote 3 acres by yourself, that relativity scale certainly tips towards the large side of perception.

Here's a little more confirmation that this is indeed a Gold Deposit:

IMG_1519[1].JPG

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