Jump to content

Recommended Posts


6 hours ago, madtuna said:

Did you by them here in WA? If so what brand are they if you don’t mind.

I wear thongs a lot but the Double-Gees here go right through them and nail them to your feet. They look like they’d do the job

I had them made by a cobbie in WA.... that’sWashington State
 

they started out as good leather soles, but like you say WA has some sharp rocks and such 

so I had him glue on the Vibram sole.. works a treat!

Expensive,,,, but so is the 7000... and you can’t use it if your feet are buggered

 had no issues with anything going thru these...

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Keenes are good boots, but the last two years the glue has been separating so I had to keep taking them back in for a new pair. One pair, the keene-dry barrier failed two days after buying them. So I don't buy keenes anymore. But you can't buy a more comfortable boot than keenes. I think their quality has gone down hill.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pure rubber boots, like those tactical military ones, never worked for me, they are just not made for the rough. The glue comes off, they crack easily and don't provide good support in rocky terrain when you hike. I use the Salomon Quest 4D 3 GTX. They are not metal free but only have a small amount for support. They work just fine with the GPZ even when you run in HY/Normal >10. Just don't come too close to your boots with the coil. If you keep the coil at about 1 feet distance and greater it works well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very good question my friend and I am not sure why you didn't get more replies.

I spend over $100 a years on boots and sometimes near $300, if I get some that do not last.  I go through about 1 pair of boots a year and sometimes 2, 1 year it was 3 pr.  As those who hunt with or around me know, I am extremely hard on my boots.  I use them as a surface scraper at Rye Patch all the time since I chase whisper ghost signals and I usually can't tell if it's an actual signal until I have removed 3 to 4" in a broad 18" wide by 16" tall area.  Could I use my Apex?  Most certainly and many folks do, but since I carry it on my back, the time it takes to reach back and get it out of the sling and then put it back 3 minutes later, I just feel the boot grader is fine.

In reality I have 3 pair of boots I take on a prospecting trip.  My #1 (current) boot is a Bates. https://www.batesfootwear.com/US/en/8"-tactical-sport-boot/20073M.html and it is very tough and durable.  Now, like most other Bates I have tried, it's not a comfortable boot, so I spend another $10 to $20 on inserts, which last about 6 months.  These boots are 100% non metal and even advertised as such.

My 2nd boot is a worn out pair of Converse and I can not read the part#, but they are tan in color.  They are actually pretty comfortable, lighter in weight than the Bates and great in summer.  My biggest complaint with them is their durability and they literally started falling apart after a few workouts.  Last years I went through 2 pairs of them and started on the 3rd pair.  I can't seem to find that style anymore, but mine did not have the size zipper as someone else posted pics of.  I ordered a pair of the side zipper boots (Converse) that were advertised as non metal and the zipper handle was metal as was 2 small breather ports near the bottom of the boot on the sides.  I sent them back and was refunded.

The most comfortable boot I wear is a Merrell Moab: https://www.merrell.com/US/en/moab-2-mid-ventilator/720026487929.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&adpos=&scid=scplp720026487929&sc_intid=720026487929&gclid=Cj0KCQiAwf39BRCCARIsALXWETwfabwVRhrl8JlBSEJOOB1iZeyTA6rzeGwJKYSLhlkWjZF2B2FyG90aAoB8EALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds and I use it when I know I'm not going to be grading/dozing with my feet/boots.  These are not designed for that style of use and when I tired, dirt and gravel seem to get into the boot up over the sides as they are high ankle mid ridge.  Now one thing you'll need to do with these, is remove the upper eyelet as it is brass, but the rest of them will easily hold the show on there.

I also know of a staff Member who purchases cheaper $30 to $40 boots with no metal shank (takes his pinpointer into the store and tests them), but does have metal eyelets.  He then removes the eyelets and threads the laces in the holes where the metal eyelets used to be.  He puts an insert in the boots to his feel/liking.

A different Staff member just got a pair of (mentioned by another person) Keen's and he is quite happy with them, but they too are mid ankle level, but he says very comfortable.

I also know Doc's Detecting Supply used to sell Bates books, so maybe he has some that work for you.

Hope this helps and be sure to let us know what you eventually go to and how you like them.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Gerry in Idaho said:

I use them as a surface scraper at Rye Patch all the time since I chase whisper ghost signals and I usually can't tell if it's an actual signal until I have removed 3 to 4" in a broad 18" wide by 16" tall area.  Could I use my Apex?  Most certainly and many folks do, but since I carry it on my back, the time it takes to reach back and get it out of the sling and then put it back 3 minutes later, I just feel the boot grader is fine.

I have always wondered why someone doesn't make a 'digging boot' that allows for the wear and tear on the sides of boots and not just the soles.

Do you ever buy boots with metal in them?  The military/police tactical metal free are good choices sometimes.

Mitchel

Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally had no luck with the Bates. Poor quality and cracked after 2 months. Perhaps it was a lemon. But it really all depends what you do with them. On flat terrain they are a acceptable, but when you hike into steep rocky canyons you need something more solid

Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Gold Catcher said:

I personally had no luck with the Bates. Poor quality and cracked after 2 months. Perhaps it was a lemon. But it really all depends what you do with them. On flat terrain they are a acceptable, but when you hike into steep rocky canyons you need something more solid

Bates, just like many other major brands, have cheaper and higher end products.  I have had exactly what you experienced, a couple models of Bates in years past, the stitching started falling apart after a few days detecting.  But at the same time, the last 2 pair of Bates I have purchased are tough as nails.  Thanks for the refresher of my memory, as I didn't like the early ones either.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if these would be considered "detecting boots" but I'm partial to my Whites Smokejumpers.

https://whitesboots.com/firefighter/the-original-smokejumper/

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is an old boot thread and there have been others over the years:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Content

    • By Ridge Runner
      I was looking at wet suit’s and it said 7mm but I wanted to know what’s that in inches.
      Well here’s the formula to find out .
      7mm
      7. divided by 25.4 = inches
       Maybe some of you knew this but I didn’t.
       Chuck 
    • By ALEXANDRE TARTAR
      How much do scuba drysuit cost in the USA? What is the best quality / price ratio?

    • By mn90403
      I use a water proof, metal free calf boot most of the time when I walk on the beach.  I have bought them from various places like Walmart, sporting goods stores and online.  They are both styles of fishing boots and muck boots for agriculture and the like.  All of them crack after just a few months (many miles) and they leak.  In the past I have tried glue, tapes and other things to get more life out of them.  I've tried different brands.
      My last purchase was a pair of Tingley's and they are probably the best so far but they have now cracked down near my big toe.  They have lasted since February.  They have gone up 50% in price since then.
      Does anyone know a glue or fix for this?  I wouldn't mind even slopping something over the outside but it has to be flexible.  
      When the water is warm I could use a Clog or slipper but they don't provide the support and protection when I refill my holes.
      Mitchel
    • By kac
      Just got a pair of gloves to replace my work gloves I had snagged from a local hardware store and got these:
      https://garrett.com/accessories/garrett-gear-books/garrett-detecting-gloves
      Made really well and have a padded palm. Less money than they junk work gloves I had before.

    • By bethanyb1201
      I got a call to find an wedding ring for a guy when it was 8000 degrees. I get there and after 1 hr I am dead. He asks me if I would like to use his cooling vest. I said no due to me not knowing what it was. He starts explaining it to me so I gave it a try... ITS AWESOME!!! I detected in 110 heat index and felt kinda chilly. It lasted around 85 min before he changed out the packs. Anyone ever used a cooling vest?
    • By GB_Amateur
      As usual, some of us got off topic a few days ago on this thread:
      We got into a discussion about insect repellants, what works in some areas and for some insects, etc.  I have a question and decided to start a new thread, on this specific topic, which will also probably get hijacked. 
      My specific question to 2Valen is:  what concentration of Permethrin are you using?  I have some spray stuff but it's only 0.5% Permethrin.  I doubt that's what you are dilluting.  Also, you say "add the correct amount...".  Could you be more specific. 
      I get eaten alive by chiggers and although spray Deet works OK, they still seem to find a way around that to a limited extent.
×
×
  • Create New...