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Had another good day detecting a rather large hay field. I was using the new superfly coil on the MK, and most of my finds were all ammo related. I found 12 keepers which means no plastic. They range in age from 1920's to the 1940's. the best one, which I have never found before was a  Winchester Nublack made from 1905 to 1938. The others were REM UMC 1915 to 1942, Winchester repeater 1896 to 1938, Winchester Leader 1933, Sears unknown 1920's to 1940's, Western Xpert 1914 to 1932. If you ever want to find the head stamp dates (Cartridge-corner.com) is the place to go. I  hit up on some buckshot and a older rifled slug, AKA Pumpkin ball or as my dad would say Punkin ball. The rifled slug was developed by Wilhelm Brenneke in 1898, Karl Foster designed a similar slug in 1937 and patented in 1947. They are the ones you find in most brands today. Of course I found the wonderful 22. This round was developed in 1845 by Louis Nicolas Flobert and introduced in 1887. This was the first rimfire it was in 6mm. Union Metallic Cartridge Co. perfected the 22 in 1884, And "Voila" we have the best selling cartridge in the world. I saved the best for last because they have a great history. Finding three colonial musket balls in one field for me just does not happen. Two of them look fired the other was a drop. That ball is in beautiful shape, you  can clearly see the sprue and the casting marks around the middle. I believe they are for the old and well distributed Brown Bess. It was produced from 1722 to 1838. Over 4,000,000 were made. This gun was used in every major conflict from the American Revolution to the American civil war. So the next time your out and find some boring old ammo, You just might find some cool history in your hand. 

 

 

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Terrific finds, and history lesson Dog!!

   I like those as much as old coins! Neither of which goes much before WW2 in S. Florida!

   Keep at it! There's bound to be some coin's out there too!👍👍

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50 minutes ago, dogodog said:

If you ever want to find the head stamp dates (Cartridge-corner.com) is the place to go.

Excellent finds, DoD, and thanks for the info and especially the link.  I have several I'd like more info on.  It seems just about everything is collected by someone or another and sharing that info is a big plus to casual observers like me.

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GB, I forgot to mention another great site. aussiemetaldetecting.com  They have Australian, UK and US head stamps. Hope this helps!!!

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4 hours ago, dogodog said:

GB, I forgot to mention another great site. aussiemetaldetecting.com

Looks like you're referring to this sub-address:  https://aussiemetaldetecting.com/shotshell-resources/shotshell-headstamp-database/

Thanks.  Now I have a bunch of research to do and two places to do it!

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Great finds and hope you have more luck in the next hunt.

Good information and good pictures with the story, thanks.

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I find a lot of ammo in my area from old to new. Lots of old shotgun shells and pellets. Found a .44 magnum shell a while back! People aren't supposed to hunt with long guns or handguns here, but often use a handgun to "finish". Now you've got me interested in the history of it!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Dug  a US Cartridge Climax no. 16 today, they were made from 1864 to 1921. Definitely an oldie! Especially liked the screw thread look to the brass. No shell, they were paper. I don't pay much attention to them, but if anyone collects them I could send it. Also dug a live 30-30 winchester shell. Hope there's no real danger to that.

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26 minutes ago, F350Platinum said:

Dug  a US Cartridge Climax no. 16 today, they were made from 1864 to 1921. Definitely an oldie! Especially liked the screw thread look to the brass. No shell, they were paper. I don't pay much attention to them, but if anyone collects them I could send it. Also dug a live 30-30 winchester shell. Hope there's no real danger to that.

Can you post a pic? Here's one I found online

 

Image result for climax shotgun shell nno. 16

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   F350,

  As long as your not wacking the shell with a hammer, you should be good!!🤣  Cool stuff!👍👍

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