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Got a break in the weather today, it has rained for the past two. The last two days before it rained I found very little, I thought the field was "drying up". Today I realized why - it had been a week or more since it rained, so I think the ground lost conductance - it dried up! I should probably revisit my last couple of grid walking days. I have been averaging 3-4 buttons a day, and today was no exception. I also find a lot of shoe buckle parts. There was a lot of foot traffic here from the 1700s on, I am trying to find out why.

Also learned today to follow more faint signals, especially those that go up in tone which may or may not give an initial VDI. I am using field 2, 50 tones with the horseshoe on. I found the large ornate piece about 12" down, one of the deepest holes I have dug. It started out as a faint 13, and ended up a solid 19. Same with the 1884 Indian head, it was faint probably due to being on edge. The rising tone above all prompted me to dig.

The smallest button is stamped GILT off center and appears to have some of its plating still. It was a solid 14, the same VDI my wedding ring gives. The biggest mystery is the heavily corroded button, it has lettering on it, and shows some brass or gilt, but it is so far unreadable.

Fun day and a great learning experience! There were hunters all around me rabbit hunting, gunfire and dogs everywhere. 

Another thing of interest  is the very large furniture tack next to the twisted copper ring. The field is full of them, all sizes and some with very sharp pins. Copper boat nails are common as well.

20210127_195358.thumb.jpg.084f2004cde71fdce80dcd91ff5ab001.jpg

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Thank you for sharing the finds and interesting observations about the area. It is always fun to get into places where "why is that here?" pops up in your mind. You do have a point though. Just what went on there? Keep on scanning and digging. The more shallower things you dig out the more deeper items can sound off for you.

Happy Hunting! I hope you find some great things there.

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27 minutes ago, RobNC said:

"why is that here?"

Thanks! Hope I don't wear everyone out with my enthusiasm and relatively mundane finds. I've only been in this hobby for 7 months now. I have found over 100 things that tell some sort of story, from cut Pistorines to buttons and relics to modern money, all within 300 yards of my front door. I want to find out who has owned this land through history. Up the road is another 200 acres that I have only barely scouted. This area was settled in the mid 1600s and hasn't changed much. It's a great way to start retirement!

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Good start for only 7 months. Back of the button may have the manufacturers name if it is a 2 piece military button. Good chance it could be civ war era

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Nothing mundane about what those finds are saying about the potential for more good finds as you continue to explore your sites.  You are just scratching the surface.  Looking forward to what you find next!

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2 hours ago, F350Platinum said:

Also learned today to follow more faint signals, especially those that go up in tone which may or may not give an initial VDI.

Would you please describe what you mean when you say "go up in tone"?

1 hour ago, F350Platinum said:

Hope I don't wear everyone out with my enthusiasm and relatively mundane finds.

I wouldn't worry about that.  There are plenty of us who like to hear and see what others are finding and how they are finding them.  With enthusiasm -- even better!  If someone doesn't like it there is a simple solution -- don't read it and move on.

You really have a good spot there, and you've shown that even with the myriad of trash you're able to fish out the loot.  Your technique will only get better and (until you've exhausted the area -- probably a long time from now) I predict your finds will improve.  Definitely keep us in the loop.

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10 minutes ago, kac said:

 Good chance it could be civ war era

I was thinking the same thing, it does appear to be a cap over a base like a two-piece, but there is no shank. It looks like it snapped off something. The back is ferrous.

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10 minutes ago, GB_Amateur said:

Would you please describe what you mean when you say "go up in tone"?

Sure. An ascending tone in 50 tone mode.

When I find can slaw or particularly a flattened beer can, the tone often starts high and goes down, visually from a 21 to a -3, or just goes all over the place!

Visually this went from 13 to 19, and narrowly at first, a rising tone. I read somewhere that the Equinox "reads" all of the alloys in a target. Seems like that is what it was doing. Really stood out.

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1 minute ago, F350Platinum said:

Visually this went from 13 to 19, and narrowly at first, a rising tone. I read somewhere that the Equinox "reads" all of the alloys in a target. Seems like that is what it was doing. Really stood out.

What is your coil path when this happens?  Is this when you are in search mode (i.e. swinging over a long path looking for good targets) or in investigation mode (after having located the target, keeping at the center of a small, repeated sweep) or something else?  I search in 5 tones and investigate in 50 tones, which isn't the norm (if there even is a norm...) and I'm trying to understand what you are experiencing so I can try it myself.

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The BIG question I only alluded to is why are there so many TACKS in this farm field? Did someone sell the farmer a cheap way to put iron in the ground? Did the British fire on the area in 1812 with "tack shot"🤔😀

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