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I still say the experts can't get it right with previous technology.  JP is finding nuggets with the 6000 on his flogged ground.  We are both right.  Everyone wins with this new detector but much of the gold is already gone.

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The 6000 does what the 5000 can do depth wise on larger gold even slightly better, but what’s the point of providing it that way to the market when there is already something much better out there for

Minelab is basically just trying to create their own social media. That's what "detexperts" are, and that's why they are choosing their own no-name relic hunting channels to give exclusive looks into

I think these pictures sum up the GPX 6000 very concisely and also how I feel about those people who continue to suggest my input is biased or just marketing hype!! Tiny piece at stupid depth for

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1 hour ago, mn90403 said:

Based upon their results as experts I would say that there is not anyone who has been able to tame their detectors completely.  These experts are now finding nuggets in patches long flogged by all other detectors and detectorists before. 

" I still say the experts can't get it right with previous technology.  JP is finding nuggets with the 6000 on his flogged ground."  

 

Perhaps you are forgetting the unknown that we have at the moment - the possibility that there is actually new tech in the 6000.  Whether it be in the brains or in the coil.  I can only imagine that is the reason that JP is finding gold in severely flogged ground - not because he didn't know how to get the best from a 5000 or a GPZ.  But that's just my guess 🙃

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Of course there is new tech.  Bring it on.  Every nugget JP finds in his flogged patches or Gerry finds in his flogged patches proves the new tech works better.  There should be new tech.  It becomes tedious to go over and over patches again just to find 'missed' nuggets.  Will the 6000 get every nugget?  I wouldn't bet on that.  There will be another generation of detector that will get the few still unseen nuggets because that will be the only game in town then also.  Jason is very much aware of the law of diminishing return.

What is the old adage used by sales people and people in general ... 20% of the people get 80% of the sales ... so 10% of the expert detectorists get 40-50-60% of the nuggets?  Luck has some connection to the nugget formula as Fred Mason told me often.

I'd rather be lucky than good.  It was easier to be lucky in the past. 

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14 minutes ago, mn90403 said:

It was easier to be lucky in the past.

Guaranteed!  😉

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Minelab's 'pitch' to me to buy detectors in the past was one of buying power and depth.  This seemed to be the message with my 5000 and the Zed (40% deeper).  So even me with poor knowledge of geology and no friends in the detecting game could find nuggets in the desert by following the presets and making a few adjustments.  Just get a smooth threshold.  I didn't need to be an expert to use the best detector on the market I was told.  I think the Zed lived up to that promise.  Even with bad settings you find gold ... if it is there.  I'm generally after 'big game' so this fit my needs.  I like playing the big game in nuggets and pool.

The success of the 2300 (I have one I don't use often) is a testament to a turn it on and go detector with few holes.  It's just not thought of as a big game detector.

The 6000 I believe now to be the next step over the 2300 and not the 5000/4500 from a sales standpoint.  It is taking Norvic's 2300 design and adding some horsepower.  (Not very technical with that description.)  

Nenad has joked he will not have to train anyone now.  He can go out and find nuggets himself.

Maybe.

I still don't have time to use one.  Good luck to all of those of you who do.

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Not all experts are created equal. Can't really compare a person like JP who detects for a living and has access to Minelab engineers to some of the Easy Experts in Arizona who advise people to run in Fine Gold and 8 gain in very mild places like Q and GB, or who don't seem to understand what the stabilizer does still after how many years...

I learned how to detect by targeting the voluminous amounts of gold missed by the latter group, and I see many of them still saying the same things today that caused them to miss all that gold 13 years ago, which means they still haven't learned and I personally don't qualify that as expert. Experts learn from mistakes, do what it takes to fix them, and then improve, constantly over and over. That's how an expert becomes an expert, and those who simply repeat the same mistakes over and over will hardly ever improve.

I wouldn't bother detecting behind a person like JP though, and I can think of 9 or 10 people on this forum (and I'm sure more I don't know) in the US who I'd truly regard as experts too in the same regard and not bother working ground they've gridded. That's expert level.

Give me a new tool that hits gold which the old tech simply can't hear, no matter how expert the operator was, and it's game on again though. :smile: That's one way to open up the goldfields, the other is to find new places. The second one can be done with 20 year old PI's and VLF's, the first way requires the newest cutting edge technology.

The 6000 appears to be trying to bridge the two concepts together and create a lightweight, fast prospecting machine that can also light up the old worked ground. Will be interesting to see how it does. 

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Jason,

Your words don't fail you like mine do me.  Thanks.

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So ... here is a question only time will tell and I think it should end up in a separate thread.

Which one of our experts will continue to use the 6000 and not go back to a Zed or a 5000 which they know like the back of their hands?  What percentage of the time will the 6000 be in hand vs any other nugget detector.

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I think the 6000 will create a niche on it's own, with the Geosense PI presenting some interesting opportunities. I do not compare machines as being either, or.  We all know the 7000 will remain king for depth in the open field. Whether or not nuggets were missed before with the 7000 that now are being recovered with the 6000, does it really matter? One machine never fits all, and perhaps some nuggets were just simply missed for other reasons. So, I am pretty certain I will continue to use all my machines, including the SDC, for the appropriate situations. I was told I get my 6000 by the end of the month, can't wait to welcome it to my fleet! 

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As most detectorists go to the most likely spots to find gold, I can see the GPX6000 to be the detector to go to. I am sure JP and not forgetting other experts will be looking in other locations even if it is deeper to get some deceit weight close to hot spots due to their expertise. In old posts JP got attacked from a trip for saying that he had got over a thousand nuggets. One thousand nuggets as Jason said"But 1000 0.03 gram dinks is only 30 grams, not even a troy oz." Looking at a very limited UTube videos 1000 times many minutes in getting them, with my experience I will be continuing using my old GP-3000 looking for untapped new ground for new patches or an extra depth that can be gotten with later detectors/coils design that concentrate on acheaving deaper /large nuggets in known ground. To back up my thoughts, In my first double ounce patch we hand dug down up to 18 inches to bed rock. Yes we got a few nuggets that were out of range but the total weight was not worth the effort less than ¼% of the total. When we get a detector that goes very deep I will go over the deeper ground and hope it pays for the cost of a new detector. JP and other pros are still using their GPZ as their main deep searching gold detector to earn their income. Now lets be realist there are prospector and fossickers most start off as fossickers and realy enjoy finding gold no matter how small in size (skill in metal detecting) and value however some are more interested in prospecting that is finding new locations (hard to do but sometimes very rewarding) as their challenge after their lust for gold move to the next level. Considering all of the above I thing that the GPX might be a good patch finder.

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