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Anyone up for a two weekend Vintage Metal Detector treasure hunt? It would be from one Sat thru the Weekdays and ending the following Sunday. You must dedicate yourself to using a vintage detector(s) at any location(s) of your choice.  BFO, TR, IB, OR, VLF/TR type. You will post all of your finds found using the detector(s) you used.   All based on the honor system. It would show folks that vintage detectors are still alive and kicking finding treasure. If there's interest. I will work up a hunt.

Date probably June or July.

Detector would have to be no newer than 1985?

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Steve, My first detector (1975) was the one on the top of the ad. I traded  a saxophone for it to a guy with a brain tumor that couldn't go out detecting but thought he might learn to play the sax. Looking back I think we both made a poor deal, except it got me into a great hobby.  

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I owned all three. Started with the Coinmaster 4 in 1972, got the Goldmaster big box next (same circuit board in larger box!:laugh:), and had the Alaskan somewhere along the way. My old White’s distributor gave me an Alaskan years ago (thanks Mary), and I’ve held onto it because, well, I’m an Alaskan! And it ties me back to my beginnings with Whites all those years ago. I became a dealer as a teenager in 1976, so Whites and I go way back.

I will get some good photos of my machine and post soon as a new thread.

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I don't own any pre-'85 detectors anymore except for my first machine (a Treasure Probe IV that I bought in 1970), and it doesn't work anymore. The old White's Coin Master, 4900. 6000 Di Pro, Compass 77, Ground Hog, etc were all sold or used as trade ins years ago. My oldest now is my good 'ol Whites Eagle II SL90. Good luck in your hunts guys! 

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I would have to get my Dad's D Tex BFO fixed!

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This sounds like a blast!  Unfortunately I traded out my Tesoro Silver Sabre for the Silver Sabre micro-Max.  If I can get my hands on a pre-85 Tesoro... I am definitely "in".  

Tim.

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16 minutes ago, Mike_Hillis said:

Oldest one I currently have is the Tesoro Golden Sabre II.   Is that considered Vintage?   I dunno.

HH
Mike

Introduced about 1992

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