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8 hours ago, sturt said:

Potential purchasers of the new 6000 (when it gets here) will need to be careful how they throw it around, because the feet at the rear of the detector comes off the battery cover,

It never occurred to me to throw an expensive detector around (or any detector or equipment for that matter). Not sure what your guy's intentions are when spending 6-10k that at some point needed to be earned. I love my machines too much to treat them like sh.t. 😵 Now, accidental drops that's another matter. Never had any issues with that.

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I asked Steve to start a new thread involving my audio dropout and front panel button lag.  Incase some of you were coming back to this thread to seek or give answers/recommendations.

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Previous owner could have dropped it, hard to say. I don't think epoxy will hold that. Most polymers are difficult to glue. Wondery why metal detecting companies don't adopt the external plug in battery systems used on power tools like Dewalt, Ryobi etc etc. Design wise and ease of use that style cartridge is pretty durable and effective.

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My zed thin checkerplate 1mmm thick plastic feet broke apart early. The 12v cigi plug lead for the charger had such thin wires coming out of a solid plastic plug end that with a little fatigue they shorted...and on a friends zed as well.

Minelab have a great platform but fall down in detector construction. (Equinox coil connection and plastics are way too weak. Testers ...if there were any should have picked it up)

My long standing bug is minelab should give you a padded cover for the main box/battery to protect your $10,000 investment.

Working hard in rocky desert conditions it pays to have a really really thickly padded cover for the zed box to protect from the occassional drop.

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3 hours ago, RedDirtDigger said:

Testers ...if there were any should have picked it up

Sorry we let you down. 😞

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2 hours ago, RedDirtDigger said:

Minelab have a great platform but fall down in detector construction. (Equinox coil connection and plastics are way too weak. Testers ...if there were any should have picked it up)

 

 

I keep hearing this about the Nox and I just dont see where its coming from? I have used the S#@t out of my machine and have yet to break anything on it associated with the coils or any of it's connections...I bump it bang it etc...not on purpose of course but it happens occasionally Now my garret carrots I've had problems with breaking but it's my fault most likely as I have a habit of dropping them on the ground as i fumble for my digging tool.  

strick 

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3 hours ago, RedDirtDigger said:

Working hard in rocky desert conditions it pays to have a really really thickly padded cover for the zed box to protect from the occassional drop.

I agree with what you are saying RedDirtDigger - I will only say that if you have some sort of protective cover (I happen to have one made by Doc, but this isn't an ad for it because like Minelab, there is no real cushioning on the bottom of that cover either), an easy solution is to put your own padding in the bottom of the cover. As I said above, I cut a section of pool noodle in half and stuffed it into the bottom of the cover and it has worked perfectly for years as very effective cushioning.

But, the fact that MineLab either can't or won't figure out that a small detail like cushioning their multi-thousand dollar detectors, is not something they need to concern themselves with, is another in a long-standing history of not attending to small details that are inexpensive but vital to keeping their products in good working condition. After all this time of supposedly saying they are "listening to customers," it seems to be a statement that is not accurate or factual and that is too bad (for us, the customers).

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Will dropping a detector have any other adverse effects, like breaking solder joints or upsetting other internal electrical components?

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Hi Jin, guessing that's probably impossible to know til it happens right? Each time one is dropped, it is under different circumstances with different potential results. 

Hope all is well 

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3 hours ago, flakmagnet said:

After all this time of supposedly saying they are "listening to customers," it seems to be a statement that is not accurate or factual and that is too bad (for us, the customers).

Getting it mostly right has zero value then? If every thing on the internet that is said is not 100% addressed to the 100% satisfaction of everyone.... then they are not listening at all?

Who is getting it right then, and why are we not buying their detectors instead?

Anyway, since that has been deemed inaccurate, and not factual, I’ll not bother anyone with that assertion in the future. I’m sure I’m the one that’s been telling you all that product development is not happening in a vacuum, and that this forum is watched. Erase all that, I’ve just been making it up. :mellow:

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