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Gold Rush Relics From California Part 2.


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1 hour ago, F350Platinum said:

Outstanding finds! Just curious, do you remember the ID for the seated and the gold coin? You have a great spot there.

I remember the gold as 12 but with the dime it was the sudden repeatable high tone that I was paying attention to.  I think it was high 20’s. But not certain.  

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Great hunt! I've researched some of the ghost towns on the internet and it doesn't look like they are MD friendly sites. Did you just hear about this place through word of mouth? I'd LOVE to hunt an old ghost town site, if not to find some treasure, just to immerse myself in a place of rich history!

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Gold Rush Relics From California Part 2.

I am both anxious and fearful of your "Part 3".  haha. 

 

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2 hours ago, CalReg said:

... I've researched some of the ghost towns on the internet and it doesn't look like they are MD friendly sites. ...

Cal-Reg, a couple of things :

 

1)  If you google "Ghost towns" + "CA", then ... sure ... you're going to get hits like Bodie, and other such colorful *obvious-to-the-history-books" type tourist trap spots.

 

2)  Then ... sure... none of them are going to be "MD friendly".

 

3)  But you have to realize that these are only the ones/types that are a) still standing b) colorful tourist traps

 

4)  But there are HUNDREDS of little burgs that faded to nothing, and are nothing more than a vacant cow pasture, and not a tourist-trap sensitive monument.  These can be singular stage stops, trading posts, short-lived miner tent cities, etc....

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2 hours ago, Tiftaaft said:

Gold Rush Relics From California Part 2.

I am both anxious and fearful of your "Part 3".  haha. 

 

I can pretty much guarantee there will be a part three.  I am hoping anyways. 

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1 hour ago, Tom_in_CA said:

Cal-Reg, a couple of things :

 

1)  If you google "Ghost towns" + "CA", then ... sure ... you're going to get hits like Bodie, and other such colorful *obvious-to-the-history-books" type tourist trap spots.

 

2)  Then ... sure... none of them are going to be "MD friendly".

 

3)  But you have to realize that these are only the ones/types that are a) still standing b) colorful tourist traps

 

4)  But there are HUNDREDS of little burgs that faded to nothing, and are nothing more than a vacant cow pasture, and not a tourist-trap sensitive monument.  These can be singular stage stops, trading posts, short-lived miner tent cities, etc....

Here I am Tom, asking for more direction...where do you find that information?

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Hey CalReg,  here is something i use while goofing off at work.   Check it out.  Get Maps | topoView (usgs.gov)

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