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Yet another spring like day today. Started out relatively warm, about 48. I decided to do some scouting on land I haven't visited as yet so I will know where to go in the future. In particular I was looking for another house that was in one of the fields back in 1917.

I think I found it. Found what looks like a drawer keyhole, and then an aluminum child's ring with no stone. It is very fragile and pretty mangled, but highly decorated.

I visited three separate areas, two yielded coins. I dug the 1967 quarter and a 1937 wheat penny. Went way out in the field near the river and found an 1867 Indian head. It was very difficult to find the date but I did. In the area that had no coins I found one small colonial button, it appears to have a backstamp but it is unreadable.

Not bad for just walking around at random, really coin shooting.

 

20210225_203317.jpg

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1867 Indian Head penny is a semi-key.  For some reason (maybe because they minted so many during the Civil War -- those were hoarded during the war but probably recirculated in droves afterward) that from 1866 to 1872 the mintage was down and those 7 years fall into the semi-key category (IMO).  I always recommend caution in cleaning coins with numismatic value potential, and this qualifies.

You continue to rack up the nice finds in that permission.  Keep on rollin'!

 

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57 minutes ago, GB_Amateur said:

I always recommend caution in cleaning coins with numismatic value potential, and this qualifies.

Poor coin has really bad Bronze Disease, cleaning is risky. I had to get out the microscope to get the date, and even then it's a maybe.

20210225_191504.jpg

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Great save on the IH, great finds again.

Good luck on your next hunt.

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