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Gerry, It looks like I was wrong about the price per gram of my Gold Basin find. I looked just once at a comparison price on the Aerolite site Gold Basin find and did not do any further research after that. It is a very nice specimen but due to so many being found a GB, the price is much lower than I first thought.    

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