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No Work, Where Should I Go Prospecting This Summer (in Ak)


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Year #2 of Covid is shaping up to be worse than #1 so I have decided to go mining/prospecting which should use up the rest of my cash reserve. The question is where do I go? I can't really afford to do the typical tourist areas and can't afford anything like a Gaines Creek trip. So this leaves me tied to the road system.

What is the best choice, look for unclaimed spots? Try to find someone who will let you work their claims? Hit the public areas? There are millions of yards of tailings, does everyone expect you to get permission to detect something dredged in the 20s? Once you get out there and see something you want to hit you would have to go back to where you have internet and try to find if it still has a valid claim and try to call the owners, I would never get anything done.

I have VLF detectors if nugget hunting is possible but need a PI to cover hotter spots. I have a Proline 2.5 in combo highbanker and plenty of pans, sluices, tools etc.

Want to try Chicken Area and Petersville, Should we look North of Fairbanks as well or someplace else? Stay home and detect tot lots?

 

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Chicken has some pay to mine that is fair ground right in chicken once there you might be able to talk to miners and find some ground petersville has a rec area the road into there is not so good if its wet north of Fairbanks is real remote with frozen ground most places around mile 57 of the steese highway there is open ground right along the road I've talked to people that have dredged there and done fairly well at mile 67 there is a abandoned state gravel pit area its like 200 acres people do pretty good there its open to the public its along the  river just remember that Alaska is big things are far away with few people from Fairbanks north bound when you leave fox at mile 10 of the steese highway the next gas is at central mile 132 up the haul road north bound from fox the next gas is at the yukon river bridge about 200 miles 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey Steve, are you rested up yet?  😁

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Been a frigging dead run lately. Short answer is I had the same question and drove up to Chicken the last couple goes. All documented here with all the travel tips needed for the trip. Look for the last couple Alaska Adventures.

I'd like to do similar in the Fairbanks and Circle areas, but do know that with the exception a few public areas, 98% of the gold bearing ground in Alaska is under claim, and you DO NOT EVER want to get found on the wrong claims by a remote area old Alaska type. Treat claims in Alaska with great seriousness if you now what is good for you.

Alaska Public Mining Sites

How To Research Mining Areas

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