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Another lovely day here, winds at 30 with gusts to 45. It was sunny and fairly warm so I got a quick hunt in on the hill behind my house, I am now calling it Mason Jar Hill because I have found about 50 mason jar lids there, I think it was a dump. It was bush hogged recently giving me an opportunity to search it more. I don't keep any of the lids, they are all rusty and corroded. I doubt anyone would care.

I was only there about an hour before I got tired of the wind and the deer flies. Usually deer flies are suppressed by the wind but lucky me, not today! There were some spots on the hill that were out of the wind.

Finds:20210430_194247.thumb.jpg.265fcd5dde5c8147852ddc12c9c27ad9.jpg

Nice green 3oz jar, I think I damaged it digging for whatever else I was after. Heavy glass. Mangled token marked "Good for 50¢ in merchandise", sadly the vendor could not be read on the back. Old zipper pull, 1919 wheat, and a piece of decorative metal.

Here is what the jar is, I found it.il_794xN.2901033593_f4vl.thumb.jpg.8fbdabdeabcc5819e73ac809e72b64fe.jpg

Got a lot more to do here, it's only about a half acre but it's all hill. Trash was mostly handgun bullet shells and the ever present Mason jar lids. The lids ID from 21-32, so I have to dig them all. 😵

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There should be more bottles there. If you make a ground probe you can feel out spots where there might be a concentration. Maybe nothing real old but still interesting & fun.

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  JCR,

   Great idea! I've heard if one is careful, one can distinguish glass bottles from other materials by the feel, and sound the probe makes! Probably like detecting; takes some practice, I'm sure!!

 

 F350,

    Keep up the saga! Love the interesting finds!👍👍

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21 minutes ago, Joe D. said:

  JCR,

   Great idea! I've heard if one is careful, one can distinguish glass bottles from other materials by the feel, and sound the probe makes! Probably like detecting; takes some practice, I'm sure!!

 

 F350,

    Keep up the saga! Love the interesting finds!👍👍

This hill is for sale, wish I could dig. Worse it's waterfront, so I have to be careful to not cause erosion. There are a couple of older places I can go anyway.

Thanks Joe, I wonder what the "Line" is sometimes. I post a lot, I hope this saga is helping other new people, and at least amuses the experienced. Now that I'm retired there isn't much for me to do anymore for validation in the world.

If I'm seen as spamming I hope someone will let me know. Otherwise I am having a blast and sharing it! Bumble on! 🤪

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    F350,

    It just occurred to me that probing my be useful at the Ferry Landing also, to try and gauge how deep that transitional harder layers are, at various places in the muck!!👍👍

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     Don't worry, Steve is the only "Line Drawer" around here!! That being he's the "Sheriff", in these here parts! And he's no Church Mouse!!🤣👍👍 

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2 hours ago, Joe D. said:

  JCR,

   Great idea! I've heard if one is careful, one can distinguish glass bottles from other materials by the feel, and sound the probe makes! Probably like detecting; takes some practice, I'm sure!!

 

 F350,

    Keep up the saga! Love the interesting finds!👍👍

A probe is handy for sure. They are not hard to make either. I have two that stay in the Scrambler with the digging tool arsenal. Get on an old house site and find the privies & dump sites. It is a easy & positive way to confirm what my CX II Bloodhound 2 box sounds off on.

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