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Any Questions About The GPX 6000?


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2 hours ago, Jeff McClendon said:

Thanks Steve for your great response. I am a huge fan of the F75 ergonomics and the GM24K is not too bad. The MX5 was and still is one of my all-time favorites to swing. Same with the TDIs......

We may be getting a new dealer here in the Denver area soon so I will definitely be trying one out. The GPX 6000 seems to have a hand grip that is similar to the Equinox which is comfortable for me.  

Having more simplified setting choices to me is a big plus. I love my GPX 5000 for its ability to detect in so many different soil types, on a huge variety of target sizes and with so many coil choices. I also am old enough (in a good and bad way) to appreciate more simple to operate detectors than the GPX 5000.

Far exceeds Equinox in my opinion. Actually that is just a fact for my hand. 6000 is narrower, oval, not round, like Equinox.

And I do have one in my hot little hands. I'll take stuff apart if anyone wants. You'll never get a better chance to ask questions.

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I was on the team, as were Nenad and JP. Any others here? In any case, if you have specific questions about the GPX 6000, ask away, and get straight answers. If it violates our NDA expect to be told s

All my testing was northern Nevada and northern Sierras, worst locations. The 6000 handled everything I could toss at it as well or better than GPZ. It lacks disc outside of the hi and lo tone thing,

I pushed hard to have it made for you (us) so may as well enjoy.  A reminder that this takes two seconds to stow away, and I swear it feels like a feather. It weirdly feels way less heavy than 4.6 lbs

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14 minutes ago, Glenn in CO said:

Steve what is your opinion on the GPX 6000 detecting on the type what "Gerry in Idaho" calls Ghost Gold?

I think the GPX 6000 out of box will match or exceed GPZ capability out of box on "invisible gold". I always disclaim for optional coils - can of worms to be avoided.

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2 hours ago, hawkeye said:

Damn it Steve.  Stop talking about this detector.  I was going to keep swinging my 7000 and I am pushing 82.  Might as well spend the $6k while I can still walk.  Lightly used 7000 for sale.  

I pushed hard to have it made for you (us) so may as well enjoy. :smile: A reminder that this takes two seconds to stow away, and I swear it feels like a feather. It weirdly feels way less heavy than 4.6 lbs. due to everything else being so spot on.

The photos are distorting the yardstick - 30" collapsed. And look at the narrow profile - perfect for an archery case or similar.

Trust me hawkeye, the more I think about it, the more I think my waffling in trying to be fair to other models is misplaced here. This is a great detector, with performance that perfectly targets our gold and our ground in one simple t operate package. They are not kidding - easy expert for everyone. This one machine neatly addresses almost all complaints about all Minelab gold models made to date. It actually does seem too good to be true but true it is. Except for the battery door - oops! :laugh:

gpx-6000-collapsed.jpg
Minelab GPX 6000 collapsed in 2 seconds, ready to stow

gpx-6000-collapsed-minelab.jpg
Narrow profile, and armrest will squash without harm

gpx-6000-separated.jpg
Easy coil swaps with spare rod assemblies

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I think someone might be in love 🥰 😆 . My little trick will be to place a dummy connector into the headphone socket to permanently turn off the speaker during startup while waiting for BT to connect. But your right Steve the 6000 sure is a sweetie 😊, Just wish we could get more of them sometime soon, it’s driving me nuts with all the demand and constantly having to say we are out of stock. 😞  🤯 

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Aye, the 6000 is the go if your on either side of 60, are upover or downunder etc etc no question about that. What I want to know is how the hell you got ML to make an ergonomic light gold machine? They have been hell bent on torturing us all til now. 

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Come on JP you`ve had ML stop producing until you`ve cleaned out you back yard, I`m a wee older give me some more time toooooo.🤪

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36 minutes ago, Norvic said:

Aye, the 6000 is the go if your on either side of 60, are upover or downunder etc etc no question about that. What I want to know is how the hell you got ML to make an ergonomic light gold machine? They have been hell bent on torturing us all til now. 

A decade of sustained effort plus everyone on the forums saying more or less the same thing, Minelab = slow, heavy, and expensive. Two are getting fixed, the last is a crap shoot. The reality is tech gains are ever harder to come by, ergonomics was the low hanging fruit, and they are finally fixing an area of glaring weakness that I've also been pointing out to the competition for ages. Who all sat on their hands until now the ergonomics hole is getting plugged. The core design concepts here are no different than that I suggested on my "pound the table" thread. They do read the forum, and threads like that are messages. What I suggested Garrett could do with the ATX (stuff it in MX5 housing):

 

atx-prototype.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Jonathan Porter said:

Hey Steve have you noticed the dual Ground balance coil height position in your ground over there? 🤔 

No, can't say that I have per se. I kind of ground balance in response to what the machine is telling me without thinking about what I'm doing. I figure the auto tracking fills in the gaps. I'll pay more attention to that in the future.

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11 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

No, can't say that I have per se. I kind of ground balance in response to what the machine is telling me without thinking about what I'm doing. I figure the auto tracking fills in the gaps. I'll pay more attention to that in the future.

In extremely variable soils where the detector reacts aggressively when the coil is brought in too close to the ground you can achieve a different more refined ground balance (GB) to the one further away. There is a GB that is from say 25mm and up (most soils and for general use relative to ground and timings used) and then there is a refined GB that requires very careful movement of the coil from say 40mm to almost touching the ground.

This GB can shift or go out of whack extremely easily in super bad variable ground and requires regular use of the Quick-Trak button and controlled careful movement of the coil in that 40mm to touching of the ground zone (slow gentle controlled pumping of the coil). If you bring the coil out of the zone for some reason (usually when you are scraping the ground with your boot) the GB can drift very quickly (not completely out but will move slightly by say 5% to 10%). Gold Monster users will be super familiar with this style of detecting when scraping the ground chasing tiny little nuggets. 

The key is to get the bulk GB right then get the super fine close to ground GB accurate within the saturation zone to refine the GB even further allowing the detector to smooth right out. I have never been able to get this super fine GB right with any other detector till the 6000 came along. 😊 

JP

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