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Making The Move From GPZ 7000 To GPX 6000


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  • Steve Herschbach changed the title to Making The Move From Gpz-7000 To Gpx-6000

Not sure the Zs dead yet, ML are clear they still place the Z as King, to me it no longer is but perhaps ML have something up their sleeve, well they`ve always got something up their sleeve. A software update for the Z, heh JP is that why your stiill swinging the Z?, you`ve updated software your trialing on yours haven`t you?. Please pass on to ML from their most dedicated "addict" DON`T exclude us X coil users from the update..... PLEEEZEEEEEEEE

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  • Steve Herschbach changed the title to Making The Move From GPZ 7000 To GPX 6000

Gerry and Steve, thanks for the great information and for sharing gold found with the various detectors along with your experienced, professional advice, tips... your patience with the questions and questioning, also the risk and this goes for all the dealers we seldom acknowledge the financial risks associated with submitting a large order on speculation. 

 From everything I’ve seen so far I can’t wait to have one My money’s down and I on a list. But it is difficult to justify the cost a little I guess even the old 14” anchor performs admirably on the tinniest bits of gold and other trash, but running hot with a threshold is tiring the 7000 is chattery and I know the repeatable whispers are possibly out of reach reducing the sensitivity or lost in the chatter running wide open so it is hours of moving very slow and recovering ground on coil sweeps, throw in the EMI from helicopters refueling  and atmospheric stuff and well, can’t get rid of all of that I know... but I am looking forward to being able to run auto hot no threshold on some known old pounded patches and see what comes up as well as patch hunting like a Steve mentioned it is clear why the 6000 will excel at patch hunting as it excels at finding the tiny bits that remain in far greater numbers in undiscovered patches and with less effort.

I agree the 7000 still has promise and a place for now, also if you think about it, it would make better sense from a marketing standpoint to release the 6000 if it outperforms the 7000 ahead of any software upgrades or new 7000 if you believe the demand for early adoption of better technology will convince GPZ owners to jump on board. Then in a year or four the Zed software release that completely decodes all that chatter... they can call the software version “Rosetta 1.0” with accurate iron identification as well as a host of other metals including aluminum. Ahhh, you mean I’ve got a chance, lol. 
 

So, Nugget Finder take note the timing on this 12” coil is difficult to understand or just unfortunate in consideration of any licensing agreements but BIG coils like the 22” X coil will be in high demand everywhere for the 7000 unless that is they become available for the 6000 first?

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This is the point I was trying to make too. Weight, software speed, sharpness of targets, ability to move fast through salt,  Auto+ mode = great prospecting rig. 

When I say a "prospecting machine", I think people generally interpret it to mean general detecting, but to me prospecting is 100% exploration. 

It's something I can toss on my ATV and hop off when needed, turn on, investigate quickly, and then quickly toss it back on the ATV and be off exploring with no delays. I quit taking my GPZ with me years ago and put my VLF on my ATV instead, and more recently just go without any detector at all on prospecting journeys. The first thing I thought after spending 15 minutes swinging the 6000 was I'd have a big gun for prospecting again finally.

The only thing I would add is the option for an 8" or 6x10" mono sniper coil and a 17-18" mono round, and then there is no need for a GPZ at all. A subtlety which I'm sure Minelab sales dept has considered. 🙂

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39 minutes ago, 1515Art said:

Gerry and Steve, thanks for the great information and for sharing gold found with the various detectors along with your experienced, professional advice, tips... your patience with the questions and questioning, also the risk and this goes for all the dealers we seldom acknowledge the financial risks associated with submitting a large order on speculation. 

 From everything I’ve seen so far I can’t wait to have one My money’s down and I on a list. But it is difficult to justify the cost a little I guess even the old 14” anchor performs admirably on the tinniest bits of gold and other trash, but running hot with a threshold is tiring the 7000 is chattery and I know the repeatable whispers are possibly out of reach reducing the sensitivity or lost in the chatter running wide open so it is hours of moving very slow and recovering ground on coil sweeps, throw in the EMI from helicopters refueling  and atmospheric stuff and well, can’t get rid of all of that I know... but I am looking forward to being able to run auto hot no threshold on some known old pounded patches and see what comes up as well as patch hunting like a Steve mentioned it is clear why the 6000 will excel at patch hunting as it excels at finding the tiny bits that remain in far greater numbers in undiscovered patches and with less effort.

I agree the 7000 still has promise and a place for now, also if you think about it, it would make better sense from a marketing standpoint to release the 6000 if it outperforms the 7000 ahead of any software upgrades or new 7000 if you believe the demand for early adoption of better technology will convince GPZ owners to jump on board. Then in a year or four the Zed software release that completely decodes all that chatter... they can call the software version “Rosetta 1.0” with accurate iron identification as well as a host of other metals including aluminum. Ahhh, you mean I’ve got a chance, lol. 
 

So, Nugget Finder take note the timing on this 12” coil is difficult to understand or just unfortunate in consideration of any licensing agreements but BIG coils like the 22” X coil will be in high demand everywhere for the 7000 unless that is they become available for the 6000 first?

I often have questionable decisions to make with detectors. Whenever you can afford it, keep the old one, get the new one, and see what happens. In my case I wake up at some point and realize I'm just not grabbing "that one" any more, and off it goes.

I'll be surprised if Minelab invests another dollar into the old GPZ platform. Not making the small coil tells that story, and I see now why they did not bother.

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31 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

I often have questionable decisions to make with detectors. Whenever you can afford it, keep the old one, get the new one, and see what happens. In my case I wake up at some point and realize I'm just not grabbing "that one" any more, and off it goes.

I'll be surprised if Minelab invests another dollar into the old GPZ platform. Not making the small coil tells that story, and I see now why they did not bother.

Could be interesting If the GPZ is a one trick pony for Minelab or not if in fact it is truly deeper on big gold? will they discontinue sales and support or keep it in production, but then who would be willing to pay the price when the 6000 sells for less is lighter and everything else... enough buyers around the world to justify the cost of maintaining the line? 
 

the void in removing production of the 7000 might lead to a strong secondary market if killing it created a void and the coil chips in a similar situation to Jeep computers at commanding crazy prices for working units, nugget finder would be able to supply that I guess if the Z coil market was strong enough. Alas, ‘‘twas fun while she was pretty, the full hips athletic and seductive... oh, the years.

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That 7 was always a back wrecker of a machine. Amazing patch cleanup tool, but certainly not an enjoyable prospecting experience. Glad to part with mine, and looking forward to a 6000 in my hands.

 

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To me, even for small gold it is all about depth. The 7 hears 1 g nuggets as very faint whispers where no other detector can reach, i.e. in the desert with Caliche 2 feet down. As Steve said, the gold is mostly small here. But many targets are deep. In these situations the GZP has been shining, at least for me. I am very curious to see how the 6 will measure up at the detecting edge of the 7 for deep small(er) gold.

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On 5/13/2021 at 7:15 AM, Steve Herschbach said:

I've lost track of how many 1 - 3 ounce nuggets I have dug, but very few were a whisper. Usually just the opposite. I'd be surprised if your experiences at Ganes Creek were any different. The hard part is getting over the big nugget, but once that happens, it is not usually a question of whether a target is there or not. 

That some it up, only a small % of my ounces plus were whispers. I only uses the big guns (coils) when the ground get too deep for the smaller nuggets. I am sure when the GPX6000 sales are exhausted we will get a GPZ8000 Geosence Plus with all the bells.😁

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