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Back From Alaska, A Different Version


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Thanks for the story.  It is good to get out there.

It reminds me of our trip a few years back when we went to Nome.

Mitchel

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Cool trip Chris,

   Glad you came home with a little extra weight in your pocket! And some great adventures to tell us about!👍👍

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Congrats Chris, I enjoyed reading the story and someday hope to go to Alaska.

Good luck on your next hunt.

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Thanks for the story and pictures from Goldtopia, otherwise known as Alaska. 

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Chris,

Thanks for the pictures and story, this is a great time of year to be in Fairbanks. I was there also years back during this time of year and had a great time, the mosquitoes were not even bad when I went and enjoyed the long daylight hours.

Ron

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this is a great time of year to be in Fairbanks.

It was warm and mostly pretty dry while we were there but it is changing fast now. The days are getting shorter, the weather getting cooler and wetter.

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