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Where Are The Park Sun Bathing Spots?


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I know everyone says hit the sun bathing spots in parks, but around here, people don't seem to sunbathe a lot in the parks. Or I just never see it.

I saw 1 woman sunbathing in the park near my work 1 time, and found tungsten close by when I came back the next day at lunch.

Typically, where in the parks where you're at, do you see people sunbathing?

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Yeah, in sure lots of parks in other states it's more common. Do they tan or sunbathe near trees, the tennis courts, in the center of the park?

The one time I saw it here, the lady was on the edge of a trees shadow.

 

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Big open area's are ideal with easy access to a main path or parking lot. People usually lay out on their lunch break. If its a very old park Google it, you might find some older photo's that will help you narrow the good spots down. Don't limit yourself to sunbathing, look for trees that the rug rat's climb and lose coins. Today's kids are not climbing tree's(helicopter moms), but way back when it was good fun. Think activity like frisbee, horse shoe's, pickup game of football. All of these things result in lost treasure. And the best tool you can use is the historic aerials site to look back in time. Good luck !!!

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I walk a bit of beach uptah camp , and so do the others there but the towel crowd always seem to plunk down the first bare spot they get to..so earlier it's near the parking and moves out from there as the day goes on.  The ones walking,,,well they'll be right there with you ! "Did you find anything????"   

The southern beaches kinda the same but there are many more places to park plus hotels and other attractions on the beach spreads it out much more......but still clusters spreading out from each access point .

ACCESS POINTS themselves at the big beaches could take up a day without getting near the wet stuff...... 

         

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I recently was sitting in a parking area next to a fenced off swim pool in a public park. There was a wooden fence in front of me and I eyeballed something more yellow than it should be on a fence rail.  I was about to drive away but decided to get out and see the mirage 1st. Hmm, whats this? A heavy gold chain laying on the fence rail with broken clasp and no markings!!!

It is quite heavy,just no markings, eyeballing paid off, or at least it wasn't just my wild imagination. No detector needed. Should I take it to a jeweler or what?

-Tom V.

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1 hour ago, tvanwho said:

I recently was sitting in a parking area next to a fenced off swim pool in a public park. There was a wooden fence in front of me and I eyeballed something more yellow than it should be on a fence rail.  I was about to drive away but decided to get out and see the mirage 1st. Hmm, whats this? A heavy gold chain laying on the fence rail with broken clasp and no markings!!!

It is quite heavy,just no markings, eyeballing paid off, or at least it wasn't just my wild imagination. No detector needed. Should I take it to a jeweler or what?

-Tom V.

Look for any signs of wear and see if it is plated. Plated pieces usually have a scratch, bubble or worn spot where you can see the copper base plating and often base metal.

If no signs of plating then get yourself an acid test kit.

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