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How To Replace Equinox Battery


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A lot of people fretted over this battery replacement. The concerns of water ingress and such if anyone other than Minelab replaces it.

The replacement of the battery is common sense, and no need to send it in to minelab for a battery swap. I'm a little surprised there isn't some kind of plug between the shaft and pod leading to the battery to fill that space. Having such a thing would add even more piece of mind and surely prevent water ingress even more. Seems they used a very miniscule amount of silicone grease too.

Anyways, battery replacement seems simple and straightforward. I wonder when they are going to make the batteries more readily available?

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replaced mine just last week. Bought the battery from Crawfords in the UK. the battery was not as easy to remove as the video indicates but I did eventually free it. All replaced and working fine now

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16 minutes ago, Nig the Dig said:

replaced mine just last week. Bought the battery from Crawfords in the UK. the battery was not as easy to remove as the video indicates but I did eventually free it. All replaced and working fine now

Perhaps that is the reason for the silicone grease. If there wasn't enough installed on the battery at manufacture it would be harder to remove I'd think. That grease serves 2 purposes, sealing and lubrication. Did you take notice of how much grease was present after you removed the battery?

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No mention of the [ have to guess silicone grease ] , always a good idea for links to battery , maybe even a small tube of grease ?  

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I used to do scuba repair work. It will be food grade silicone grease, no petroleum base, and too much is not good. You want just enough to “wet” the orings.

Previous thread on subject (2019)

From https://parts.minelab.com/category-s/270.htm

EQUINOX Battery Replacement

Replace the EQUINOX Series internal Li-Ion battery. 

Due to the waterproof design of EQUINOX Series detectors it is strongly recommended you read all instructions prior to commencing the battery replacement.

A video demonstrating the replacement process can be found on the Minelab YouTube Channel at this link: EQUIONX Battery Replacement Video

All Minelab Authorised Service Centres can perform the internal battery replacement if you prefer to have the work performed without possibility of voiding your Control Panel warranty. 

The EQUINOX internal Li ion Battery has a warranty period of 6 months from original date of detector purchase.

Overview

  • Detector: EQUINOX Series
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time Required: 10 mins
  • Hazards: Water Ingress

Tools

  • Hex Driver 3mm (H3)
  • Hex Driver 2mm (H2)
  • Needle Nose Pliers

Parts

 

Step 1

Access the battery compartment

EQX_BatteryReplace_Step-1.jpg

Step 2

Remove the battery

EQX_BatteryReplace_Step-2.jpg

Step 3

Prepare new battery for installation

EQX_BatteryReplace_Step-3.jpg

Step 4

Replacement battery installation

EQX_BatteryReplace_Step-4.jpgEQX_BatteryReplace_Step-4_B.jpg

Step 5

Resassembly

EQX_BatteryReplace_Step-5.jpg

image.jpeg

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Steve, do you see anything an owner could do to further seal the battery area as a source of water ingress?

Nothing radical, just a simple extra layer of protection or something similar?

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the bung came out no problem but the battery itself was firmly wedged. Probably the foam on the side. also , there is another square of foam provided but the instructions do not say anything about removing the foam from the bung. might be obvious but there is plenty of space for an additional piece of foam

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12 hours ago, RobNC said:

Steve, do you see anything an owner could do to further seal the battery area as a source of water ingress?

Nothing radical, just a simple extra layer of protection or something similar?

I’ve not kept up on the issue, and do not know if it has ever been determined exactly where the leakage issue originates from. A single problem, or a collection of related failures? It seems very much luck of the draw, some heavy users having no issues, others multiple failures.

So answer is no, I’ve not really thought about it much from a modifications standpoint. My recommended solution to serious water hunters is to A. Have a backup unit and B. Only use an under warranty unit in the water (sell used before warranty expires, use money to get a new unit with three year warranty). It’s relatively cheap insurance, since the warranty is three years. Also ask yourself if you really need an 800 for in water use, as a 600 will likely do the job as well for most people. This makes the sell used and buy again scenario even more palatable.

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Gore vent intro!

The little white spot on the battery door!

   If a permanent seal is added that defeats the Gore vent, than not only would that probably void the  warranty, but also, some other spot on the Pod would most likely fail due to pressure inequalities! 

   Also, if the Gore vent is loose, or compromised, water will take the easiest route to enter! 👍👍

 

 

20210919_195645.jpg

20210919_195700.jpg

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