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GPX 6000 Normal / Difficult Timing Tips For Trash And Hot Rocks


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I like running the GPX6000 like a hotrod and trying to hear through the chatter, so I have been using Auto + with success patch hunting in a area that has very few hot rocks, just hit the difficult button when I encounter a hot rock and its usually gone, but will still get a great response on the small gold targets when switching to difficult, if in doubt I just switch from normal to difficult mode to see if it's a metal target or ground effect.  This matches up with what JP mentions on the small gold timings in the difficult settings. I also tried comparing the Auto to the Auto + but could only notice a very small difference. Would the Auto be comparable to one of the Manual setting, if so which number would closely match it?

Another thing I have been trying to do is determine the high/low tone responses on different objects in Normal vs. Difficult settings to help in trashy sites. Steve Herschbach has mentioned this in a topic linked below and got me started doing some testing. My goal is to use these setting to separate out my most common targets, square nails. Please read the article below to better understand this concept.

 

5B94B904-0B16-4A3A-AA96-0807A518BF61.jpeg

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  • Steve Herschbach changed the title to GPX 6000 Normal / Difficult Timing Tips For Trash And Hot Rocks

Gotta love that easy access ability to quickly switch between Normal and Difficult. People should just do it as a habit, and note what happens, and then what they dig up. Patterns may or may not develop that could be of great help. The results are directly related to the mineralization type and level however, so results in one area cannot be relied on to be the same in an area with different mineralization. But if you hunt areas that are relatively consistent, the results you get will also be consistent.

Frankly, I recommend digging everything when nugget hunting. However, that often goes out the window in an old hydraulic pit filled with square nails, or in a camp site built on top of the gold field, littered with old trash. If time is limited you have to cherry pick as best you can, and these methods will help with that.

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I did this on my last hunt but all i got was lead.  Had a high/high on tiny lead and a low/low on a big slug.  Similar to what small and large gold “should” sound like.  I am waiting for a high/low or a low/high.   

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