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4 Carat Yellow Diamond Found In Arkansas Diamond Park


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Lots of hard work at that park, the mud rivals any I've seen elsewhere...

Now ,,,, if Minelab could make a DI detector (Diamond version of a PI ?)....

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  • Steve Herschbach changed the title to 4 Carat Yellow Diamond Found In Arkansas Diamond Park

When I got my email about this find I wondered the 'worth' of it.  They do put you in touch with some buyers and/or cutters who can turn these into real faceted diamonds.

There are some good YouTubes of professionals that work the park and have 'lockers' on the sides.  We were trying to make a return trip back there this fall but it is not going to happen now.

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If you do not want to drive to far from the goldfields, there is a small chance one might find a diamond while gold mining. Hayfork Creek in Trinity County and the Cherokee hydraulic mine in Butte County have both produced some larger  diamonds found while gold mining. That would be a double dandy day to find both in the same spot. Even better, platinum nuggets can be found in the serpentine belts in California which includes parts of Trinity County. 

DD3A1142-5DC4-428E-B3DC-776A6FC67728.jpeg

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That the same one they had the article on UPI? Posted that the other day. Bet theres mobs there now looking for more. Reminds me when they post about stocking local ponds with fish and the mobs move in :0

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17 hours ago, rvpopeye said:

Lots of hard work at that park, the mud rivals any I've seen elsewhere...

Now ,,,, if Minelab could make a DI detector (Diamond version of a PI ?)....

Spent a never to forget week at Crater Of Diamonds State Park about 30 years ago. Never been back. Too stupid to know better, I went in the middle of summer. Being from Georgia….Arkansas shouldn’t have been a problem. I was constantly assailed by insects like something out of a science fiction movie….some of the biggest horseflies I have ever seen, nasty bees, sweat flies and millions of mosquitos and chiggers. The puke yellow rotten kimberlite mud was amazing, rained every day…….even the old timers were miserable. No one found any diamonds that week.

The diamond in the link is fantastic. It has to be 1/3” in diameter and would be impossible to miss with the naked eye on the surface if the ground there wasn’t too wet. A great museum quality find and typically was done without any real “work”.  That figures.

 

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Mary Hill wrote a booklet Hunting Diamonds in California.  A geologist I met who specialized in conventional diamond geology said he searched the pit Hill mentioned and found no indication of diamonds. The diamonds found in California apparently are not from kimberlite pipes as found elsewhere.  Looking for a pipe would not be a very promising approach.  Your best chance would be exploring a pit using an ultraviolet light after dark.

I should mention that rattlesnakes can fluoresce too.

Edited by oldmancoyote1
Caution
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And scorpions!!🦂

    Too bad mountain lions, and coyotes don't "glow" in the dark as well! Or do they.........🤔👍👍

20211005_165214.jpg

20211005_165135.jpg

 

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