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Meteorite Crashes Through Ceiling, Lands Next To Woman’s Pillow


Jennifer

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9 hours ago, strick said:

I don’t know much about meteorites but how does that not burn the bed or the ceiling?

To answer your question is easier than you think.

It happened in Canada first off, so it started cooling as it came down to earth.

Second part is a little simpler than the first part, as everyone knows about all the hot air that comes from most women. ( not Jennifer) That heated up the room she was in at the time which also retained the rooms ability to keep from catching on fire.

Glad to help you understand the science surrounding this question.

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    First of all, are they sure it's a meteorite, or something that got flushed out of an aircraft, and froze in the atmosphere!!💩🤣

Secondly, Caleb,

    A future wife will read all your posts one day, and you will pay!!😱💩   🤣👍👍

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1 hour ago, Joe D. said:

Secondly, Caleb,

    A future wife will read all your posts one day, and you will pay!!😱💩   🤣👍👍

I will just blame it on the fact that I am still young and some of my grandfather rubbed off on me.

Besides, I always thought telling the truth will set you free. Maybe not with women I guess.

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On 10/25/2021 at 2:00 PM, strick said:

I don’t know much about meteorites but how does that not burn the bed or the ceiling?

From Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites by Norton and Chitwood:

Over the past decade or two there have been numerous stony meteorites that have passed through rooftops and landed on city streets where they were picked up immediately after landing.  Never has there been a report of a meterorite too hot to handle.  Warm, yes; hot, no.  The reason is simple.  At an average altitiude of about 50,000 ft, the meteorite's cosmic speed has been reduced to zero; it is now simply subject to the laws of gravity which maitains its fall at a few hundred miles per hour, too slow to produce compression of the atmosphere with resultant heating.  Only the outer millimeter or so is actually affected by the melting process and is rapidly ablated away.  No appreciable heat is conducted in the interior of the meteorite.  The temperature at 50,000 ft altitude is about -50F.  This low temperature aids in rapidly chilling the falling rock.  Long before hitting the ground the meteorite's surface temperature has been reduced to between lukewarm and stone cold.  The meteorite may even be coated with a thin layer of ice.  In fact, some meteorites have been found minutes after landing, resting on top of a snow bank -- without melting the snow.

He does say 'stony meteorite' so that leaves open the question of the other types, especially those with metallic content.  This is in a section of the book describing the evolution of a fireball (very bright meteor).  So the bright light is produced much higher in the atmosphere and apparently when low in the atmosphere the meteoroid leaves no visible signature.

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On 10/25/2021 at 8:34 PM, Valens Legacy said:

To answer your question is easier than you think.

It happened in Canada first off, so it started cooling as it came down to earth.

 

Ahhhh come on now.... prospecting in Canada's not so bad... granted our lay flat does get a little brittle and explode like a length of dynamite, and the ice does tend to get a tad thick but you learn to adapt, the levels are low, the natural riffles are showing and you can't beat the scenery. PS: And no, those were not appropriate winter gloves... LOL, those were my duty gloves, I was a member of the RCMP for a period of time in BC and didn't have proper gloves in the truck when I took this picture.

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