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When Will Metal Detecting Companies Realize The Value Of Content Creators?


Loren

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I personally wonder which metal detecting company will wake up first and realize they need to be factoring in media production into the design of their detectors, like Youtubers and other social media.

One obvious first step is glare reduction on the screen so your detector display shows well in Youtube videos. Has anybody experimented with anti-glare screen protectors on a detector? Because literally every Deus II video I have watched so far, the screen is impossible to see. Could you put a horizontal polarized coating on the display and then use a vertically polarized lens? It's a topic beyond my expertise, but I would be curious to know more.

Another would be to give us a way to record the raw audio. The Deus II being able to output from the Speaker and the Headphones simultaneously is a great addition, but their screen displays so poorly on video. They should also be designing the UI / display with recording video in mind (e.g. make sure the important information is displayed big on the screen). A dream feature would be the ability to record a raw dump of the detector display data over time and plug that data into a visualization of the detector screen to overlay directly into a video.

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23 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

Hopefully we don’t get any skewing of detector designs to fit social media “demands.” I want manufacturers to pay attention to what real world users need. The people shooting video are the ones responsible for camera angles, background noise including wind noise, and glare. That’s just basic sound and lighting 101, and says more about the experience and desire of the person shooting the video to produce a quality video, than it does about detector design.

Just my opinion.

The truth is nowadays when somebody wants to buy something, they go on social media (youtube, etc) and look up reviews and videos of the product in action. That is how consumers are informed about the product and ultimately make their decision.

If a company appealed to content creators, (e.g. making a low glare screen that isn't a total nightmare to film), they would incentivize content creators to use their detector (no reason why this would affect performance) and therefore create more videos of their detector that are of higher production quality. Also if consumers can see the screen better, they can learn more about the detector and become invested in the product.

One example from my industry, is that people livestreaming video games are a great avenue to get people to buy your video game. Modern game development strategy incorporates streaming / content creators into the design process. If you can create a game that is a better experience for their show and their audience, then they will select your game more often to stream, thus increasing exposure to the consumer. This creates a synergistic feedback loop.

The reality is every detector company is literally 10+ years behind the times in terms of marketing. 

I constantly have kids come up to me and ask me about metal detecting and many of them watch metal detecting videos on TikTok. One kid even recognized my Equinox 800 despite having never swung a detector in his life. There is a rich, untapped potential for companies to wake up and capitalize on younger markets, but they are stuck in the past, and don't understand how modern marketing works. I mean, XP is just now coming out with a very basic app with integration into the detector, possibly (if they aren't totally clueless, and I don't think they are, in fact my money is on them to wake up first) with the ability to share said finds from the app onto social media, beyond just being a collection of GPS coordinates. Oh and Nokta Makro launched their flagship product with a presentation that had the production quality of a high school video news program.

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Loren,

While portions of your suggestion do make some sense, I have to side with Steve that making metal detectors social media friendly in terms of display and audio features is pointless.  If a YouTuber has basic video skills, which many don't, this is not an issue.

As to your broader comment about metal detecting companies "waking up" in terms of marketing, I partially agree.  But a metal detector is not a video game, and your post does seem to draw some parallels.  Nor is the market for metal detectors even remotely close to that of video games.  Yes, maybe detecting companies could do a better job of marketing their products, and yes, Nokta/Makro's presentation could have been better, but overall I have seen production values increase dramatically over the last few years.  Minelab and Garrett's videos are very well produced.

Lastly, I have had many younger people approach me about metal detecting when I am out hunting.  None of them have asked about a phone app or anything like that.  They are fascinated by the device and what I am doing with it.  But somebody must be doing something right in the industry since I have seen more young people swinging Equinox 800's at the beach than any other detector in my lifetime. 

Just my two cents worth.

Bill (S. CA)

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23 minutes ago, Bill (S. CA) said:

As to your broader comment about metal detecting companies "waking up" in terms of marketing, I partially agree.  But a metal detector is not a video game, and your post does seem to draw some parallels.  Nor is the market for metal detectors even remotely close to that of video games. 

It's not just video games employing marketing with content creators in mind, it's essentially every market nowadays. I mean that quite literally. Especially if we are talking consumer electronics.

Businesses from a wide variety of markets in the world are pouring tons of money and effort into content creator and influencer based advertising and product design integration because it works. They are all designing the products with their avenue of sales in mind, which are content creators.

23 minutes ago, Bill (S. CA) said:

None of them have asked about a phone app or anything like that. They are fascinated by the device and what I am doing with it. 

That is exactly why these companies need to be taking modern avenues of marketing. Don't take it personally, but younger people tend not to ask older people about phone apps to begin with 😄 (Plus my point about the XP Deus II with a basic app is already 10+ years out of date, so it was an example of them being behind the times!)

 

23 minutes ago, Bill (S. CA) said:

But somebody must be doing something right in the industry since I have seen more young people swinging Equinox 800's at the beach than any other detector in my lifetime. 

It's because people are swinging them in Youtube videos and TikTok videos, etc. 

The more manufacturers can incentivize content creators to swing their detector, the better they will do. One proven avenue in literally every other industry, is to make a content producer facing feature and marketing campaign. (e.g. a screen that films better in a variety of conditions, direct audio recording, etc.). A content creator's videos will do better when they have better production value (meaning they make more money, more views, clicks likes, etc.), so if your product allows them to make a better video, then they will be quite literally financially incentivized to swing it.

This isn't a marketing strategy specific to video games. It's literally the modern marketing formula for everything nowadays. Once a detector company modernizes their marketing team and strategy, I think there is a ripe portion of untapped market for them to sweep.

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1 hour ago, Steve Herschbach said:

Hopefully we don’t get any skewing of detector designs to fit social media “demands.” I want manufacturers to pay attention to what real world users need. The people shooting video are the ones responsible for camera angles, background noise including wind noise, and glare. That’s just basic sound and lighting 101, and says more about the experience and desire of the person shooting the video to produce a quality video, than it does about detector design.

Just my opinion.

Just turn on the display’s backlight and much of the issue will be solved. For heaven’s sake take off any environmental covers or any thing else that might make the screen harder to see if one wants to highlight any features or settings during the video. 
Also, slow down and give the viewer a chance to actually see the screen. 
 

So for me, any problems related to glare or poor screen images are the video makers fault. 

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6 minutes ago, Jeff McClendon said:

So for me, any problems related to glare or poor screen images are the video makers fault. 

Sure you can blame the user, but the reality is the new XP Deus II screen hasn't been visible in about 70%+ of videos, and if the manufacturer could spend a little R&D on it, it might turn out to be a problem the could be mitigated easily and in a cost effective manor.

I would argue it's in XP's best interest that people consuming content on their product, can actually see their product in action.

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11 minutes ago, nebulanoodle said:

Couldn’t you just film approaching the target at the angle with the least glare in addition to camera angle???

It's about making the experience easier for the user and being able to advertise that to incentivize content creators to swing your detector, which in return sells detectors. 

Producing content is difficult and time consuming, quality of life improvements in terms of product design can be very appealing.

Imagine if GoPro took user feedback on their camera's audio recording platform that stated wind was ruining 60%+ of their footage and replied with "Well don't film in the wind! Duh!", instead of recognizing the problem, developing a wind noise reducing algorithm and advertising said feature. That would be silly.

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17 minutes ago, Loren said:

Sure you can blame the user, but the reality is the new XP Deus II screen hasn't been visible in about 70%+ of videos, and if the manufacturer could spend a little R&D on it, it might turn out to be a problem the could be mitigated easily and in a cost effective manor.

I would argue it's in XP's best interest that people consuming content on their product, can actually see their product in action.

I am not blaming the “user”. I am pointing the finger at the video makers. 
 

If someone really wants to make informative metal detector videos that involve display screen details, they need to have planned for possible screen glare and tested their equipment accordingly. 
 

I have owned a Deus 1 and ORX for years. Turning on the backlight to the always ON setting while I hunt wearing  polarized sunglasses makes the screen much easier to see. Same goes for photos or videos of the screen along with using more close-up shots of the Deus1, ORX or Deus 2 screen. 

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