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From this webpage:

905768736_Screenshotat2022-03-06140012.png.ebf0f7185fe158a6e16fa2af8db5ff8d.png

More the size of a flip phone than a smartphone.  I'm skeptical any IB/VLF would pick this up at 3 ft depth.  Even 2 ft sounds very difficult to impossible even under ideal conditions.  Also, it's not a good assumption that a stack of identical (touching) items would respond as an equivalent single piece of metal that size, either in its digital Target ID (dTID) nor its signal strength.  Often the (metal) container of a buried cache results in the detector signal, not the individual treasure items.

One problem with searching for deeply buried, even large objects with a standard metal detector (IB/VLF or PI) is that small items closer to the surface will also signal.  Two box detectors have an advantage in that respect since they are insenstive to small sized objects but I don't know if they would pick up something this small.

I would expect the dTID (i.e. maximum value) to be very high and hope it wouldn't wrap around to iron.  But that only applies to an air test.  Unless the ground is white beach sand there is likely to be considerable change in dTID due to the soil mineralization.  So using discrimination probably is a bad idea.

The typical advice for finding a cache is to discover as much as possible about the tendencies of the person who hid it, e.g. favorite haunts (shop, garage, garden,...) hoping for clues to narrow down the location.  A needle in a haystack is easier to find if you first can narrow down the part of the haystack it is located.

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2 hours ago, GB_Amateur said:

From this webpage:

905768736_Screenshotat2022-03-06140012.png.ebf0f7185fe158a6e16fa2af8db5ff8d.png

More the size of a flip phone than a smartphone.  I'm skeptical any IB/VLF would pick this up at 3 ft depth.  Even 2 ft sounds very difficult to impossible even under ideal conditions.  Also, it's not a good assumption that a stack of identical (touching) items would respond as an equivalent single piece of metal that size, either in its digital Target ID (dTID) nor its signal strength.  Often the (metal) container of a buried cache results in the detector signal, not the individual treasure items.

One problem with searching for deeply buried, even large objects with a standard metal detector (IB/VLF or PI) is that small items closer to the surface will also signal.  Two box detectors have an advantage in that respect since they are insenstive to small sized objects but I don't know if they would pick up something this small.

I would expect the dTID (i.e. maximum value) to be very high and hope it wouldn't wrap around to iron.  But that only applies to an air test.  Unless the ground is white beach sand there is likely to be considerable change in dTID due to the soil mineralization.  So using discrimination probably is a bad idea.

The typical advice for finding a cache is to discover as much as possible about the tendencies of the person who hid it, e.g. favorite haunts (shop, garage, garden,...) hoping for clues to narrow down the location.  A needle in a haystack is easier to find if you first can narrow down the part of the haystack it is located.

I have read the silver bars would pick up better than gold.? Would be 4 gold and 4 silver placed together thoughts?

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2-3  feet you would be lucky to hit anything with most vlf's it would probably read like Iron if anything....and  yes silver would be easier to detect then gold

strick

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