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Question About Axiom Ground Balance Numbers


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Hi @Steve Herschbach

Did you find below repeatable (you may not have tested this), could you literally determine a ground number for a particular area and then go back later that day or the next with different environmental/atmospherics and it showed the same number? This is going to be great for logging certain areas of ground.

Or was is strictly an arbitrary number the Axiom assigned for that ground balance session that was different each time?... I've only been a Minelab and Infinium PI owner so correct me if I'm wrong, this would be the only PI so far that gives us this info or did others?

Thanks in advance Steve.

Jen

 

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The dual ground balance numbers are always the same for same ground, coil, and mode combo. Changing the coil, or the mode (Fine, Normal, Large, or Salt) will cause the numbers to change. As far as I know, this is the first dual channel PI to tell you the actual ground balance numbers. At most with other detectors you had a knob setting  position that might be related to a position, and thereby a number, but nothing like these two big numbers in your face.

The numbers can be very consistent over a large area, or change every few feet. It simply depends on the ground. Large swaths of homogenous ground will read the same over a large area. Highly variable ground, or ground consisting of a field of large mixed rock cobbles, will have numbers that vary depending on what exactly is under the coil. For instance, you could balance directly over a hot rock. In this type of ground it’s important to sweep around a bit to get a feel for the ground feedback, paying of course attention to whether there are nails or other targets one might accidentally be over while balancing. If you do accidentally mis balance over something, you will find out soon enough from audio feedback, that the machine is out of balance.

Note that ground balance window procedure below for dealing with a hot rock will leave you with different numbers than just balancing to the ground alone. Also, in highly variable ground, ground tracking may be employed. The chart below shows the range not just for ground, but some metal targets. This might form the basis of some discrimination tricks as people gain experience with the detector.

This is so important it needs to be repeated. Changing the coil, or the mode (Fine, Normal, Large, or Salt) will cause the numbers to change. Anyone comparing the GB numbers, must also make note of the coil and mode employed!

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WOW!!! SWEEET... I see myself using these more than I used the onboard GPS on my 7 (which I never used once), this is VERY cool.....

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I added this to the post above, as it is extremely critical for anyone recording numbers, and especially if comparing numbers with others.

This is so important it needs to be repeated. Changing the coil, or the mode (Fine, Normal, Large, or Salt) will cause the numbers to change. Anyone comparing the GB numbers, must also make note of the coil and mode employed!

I have done some testing and reporting of numbers, and for consistency I like to do a full reset of the detector, then do a ground balance and record them using the default settings (Fine Mode, Medium Speed, etc). Using a methodology like this can help insure consistency, and can be reported simply as which coil you are using, at default settings. If you mess with the settings, you need to record what changes you made. It’s also possible to see some small change in numbers if the EMI Frequency setting is at either extreme, in other words, readings at Frequency 5 may vary slightly from Frequency 95, depending on the situation.

To perform a full reset, when the detector is already on, hold the power button for a few seconds. The machine will make a double blip, and GB numbers will go to 49 49. I then power the machine off, and back on. The detector is now fully reset to factory defaults, GB memory cleared, and any issues that could possibly occur from a coil change have been cleared also. Axiom when doing the iron check procedure does know if a mono or a DD coil is attached, and as a part of my personal tuning procedure, I like to do a full reset and rebalance after any change of the coil, and any time I change locations enough that the ground itself has changed dramatically. You'll never go wrong with making a full reset, and start clean process, a part of your regular tuning procedure.

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58 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

This is so important it needs to be repeated. Changing the coil, or the mode (Fine, Normal, Large, or Salt) will cause the numbers to change. Anyone comparing the GB numbers, must also make note of the coil and mode employed!

Thank you Steve, great information and thanks for bringing my reply to another post, this unique thread... I foresee lots of fun numbers sharing on areas here. I'll be making an Excel for the exact reasons you mentioned, you need to keep in mind ALL the variables used at that time, not just the ground.... GREAT reminder.

PS: There are also lots of great iPhone and Android GPS apps that will let you not only capture the lat/long of where you are at but also take a picture and make notes of items such as settings, coil used etc.

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