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Minelab Vs Garrett Marketing


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Manufacturers and retailers can't hide problems like they used to now with the Internet being mainstream, although they do still try, usually by talking down the problems making out they're not as bad or as common as it seems.  They can't be hidden now with customers talking about them and putting up photos and video of their problems.  At least it makes manufacturers more accountable and hopefully causes them to strive for better quality products.

The occasional person with a bad experience you can understand but when the numbers of people complaining are abnormally high it's a red flag.

I don't particularly pay attention to marketing, although I would like a Manticore I've not watched most of the videos on it, and I skimmed through the couple I did watch,  I'd rather wait until a few forum members that bought it start putting up their thoughts about it, word of mouth is the best marketing, not some video made by the manufacturer or retailers with the goal of selling the product.

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10 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

That does not fly for long these days. Nor does overselling product capability. The truth is found out fast, and spreads rapidly. Companies can try to pull the wool over our eyes still, but the chances are high they will get caught, and their reputations suffer for it.

I agree that when a company oversells, the customer (even the newbies) usually find out pretty quickly. But that doesn't always hurt the company's reputation to a significant extent. I think a great example of this is Garrett and its AT Max.

In other words, if a company's reputation is big/good enough compared to its competitors, they can get away with a lot more overselling. Combine this fact with the ignorance and naivety of many new metal detectorists who are just starting out and it's no wonder Garrett continues to market the way they do. 

TL;DR: when there's a "sucker born every minute" there's little incentive to be honest.

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I think Garrett fills a gap between, new to detecting and mid level hunters. It's a solid niche and gives good value for the money. Is it a Minelab? No it's not, but not many can compete with the money Minelab has to put into R&D. Garrett has done well, better than Whites in terms of marketing, even though I would put White's as the more advanced detectors. The AT Max probably didn't do enough to justify it over The AT Pro, but every manufacturer gets us with a less than stellar machine every once in a while..... I guess that makes us all suckers 🤔

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I always felt you likely had a faulty AT Max mh9162013, you never seemed to like it much and if I recall correctly had a lot of stability problems.  The AT Series I think are fantastic detectors although I've only got the AT Gold to base that off and I've never even touched an AT Max, yes they're basically over a decade old now though and its showing with some of the competitors having much more modern detectors. There are probably tens of thousands of happy AT users the world over and plenty of good finds too.  I like that they're waterproof, and not regular leakers.

I look forward to seeing the AT series replacement multi freaker when it comes out, I hope it's got the nice big Apex screen.

As for marketing, they must do a stellar job of it.  Their Facebook group has approx 42000 users following it, 40,000 of them liked the group and 4.7 out of 5 stars for their reviews.  Garrett are very active on there with videos, information, competitions with prizes etc, that seems like a well marketed business to me.  They even respond to customers questions, something some of the competition are very much lacking.

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12 hours ago, phrunt said:

I always felt you likely had a faulty AT Max mh9162013, you never seemed to like it much

Based on what others had experienced, my personal observations and experiences with the AT Max were normal.

The issue I had with the AT Max was not its performance, but its MSRP. Taking its performance in isolation, it's an amazing machine. But once you factor in its price, it's not a good machine. And it's not a "good" machine because of what you're getting for money you're spending.

How does this relate to marketing? Garrett knows the AT Max is overpriced, so they have to market it in a way to try and justify its high price.

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Yes, Minelab came out with the Nox at quite a low price point which made many products seem a bit over-priced and quite a few brands have responded by lowering prices a bit or releasing models at cheaper pricing.  It turned into a successful strategy for Minelab as now a majority of people own one.  Now they've got us on the hook though the new model Nox 1500 is near triple the price of the Nox, at least here it is so they've gone back to their usual expensive priced detectors now they've got us roped in.

I think with Garrett perhaps a bit of a premium is paid to keep them made in the USA and they use that in their marketing, they haven't jumped on the bandwagon with Minelab and getting their products made offshore in Asia where the labour market is very much cheaper along with everything else involved such as the factory price and transport.  How it's reflecting on their quality though you can be the judge.  I have a 12 year old Australian made GPX 4500 that's original battery still lasts a full day and the detector itself has had a very reliable life between myself an the original owner that bought it in the USA. 

Some modern detectors seem to have far less longevity and reliability, far less........   I also own an African GPX 5000, by African it spent its life in Africa being used by African prospectors and they seem to treat them rough, very rough, they get beaten up quite badly but they keep on working well.  The coils look like they're lucky to be holding together so bad I told him I didn't want the coils when I got mine, save on shipping and leave them behind.  This African GPX was likely made in Malaysia so the country of origin isn't the main reason for the lack of quality on some modern detectors as it's a good bullet proof detector.  I'm wondering how the current generation of detectors that seem to be targeting that African market with their marketing will handle such a tough lifestyle.  The Axiom looks built to cope with it I think, the 6000? perhaps not so much.

Note how Garrett can proudly say made in the USA on their products, and they do, my 24k even has a nice American flag on it embedded into the plastic and I couldn't count how many times it says made in USA on the packaging and detector and coils  Minelab aren't so happy to promote their made in Malaysia, I don't see a Malaysian flag on my 6000 and a big made in Malaysia blasted all over the packaging.   You do pay a premium for country of origin, not that the other countries are bad in anyway, it's not about that, ask any Aussie if they wish Minelab stayed Australian, most will say yes. Good on Garrett for sticking with their roots even if it does mean they're a bit less competitive at the cheap end.  

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