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A Tragedy And A Fake?


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1 hour ago, strick said:

The second coin I'm sure is a fake...

How sure?  Is it the right thickness for an authentic coin of this type/period/etc.?  That's one dead giveaway if not.  (Of course you'll know more when the Eurpopeans here answer.)  I have a reproduction from the middle ages that shows the mold line on the edge -- game token or child's toy.

I've found enough out-of-place items to never rule anything out before I make sure.  My (authentic) Civil War relics are a good examples.  No battles fought with over 100 miles from where I found them, and no assemledge of soldiers, either.  (Likely mementos brought back from the war and eventually lost or tossed.)  Masonic penny from the California motherload country -- 2000+ miles away?  (Possibly lost by a collector who traded for it, or a mourner tossing it out after a funeral, etc.)

Hope it's genuine....

Interesting but sad find, that coin sandwich.   Nickel probably 1885.  I'm sure one quarter is a 1916 and the other a 1918/17-S.  😁  Oh, I seem to recall you've already found the latter.  (!!  It was one of you NCal detectorists.)  If that's the case I'll gladly accept the reject.

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Strick - your spill appears to have gone through a fire/heat event.  Too bad they are so badly fused.  Bet you see some bubbling on the quarter under a scope.  

Guess it's a unique kind of find....but I'm sure you'd prefer they were separate.

No idea on the Euro coin....will be fun to see what the experts say.

ZIncoln

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Europeans to the rescue?
The mystery coin is 'copy' of a Mary Queen of Scotland coin.
It reads: MARIA DEI G SCOTOR REGINA on the obverse.
( Mary, by the grace of God, Queen of Scotland )
The original coin would've been a gold coin, something like this 60 Shilling / 3 Scottish Pounds:

https://colnect.com/en/coins/coin/100043-60_Shillings_3_Pounds_Ryal_60_Shillings-1542~1567_-_Mary_Queen_of_Scots-Scotland

... or the smaller 30 shilling piece.

Whether it was intended to deceive ( maybe it was gold plated? ) or just a replica, to be used as a lucky token, or as a gaming piece, I don't know.

But it's worth looking into.
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2 hours ago, Zincoln said:

Strick - your spill appears to have gone through a fire/heat event.  Too bad they are so badly fused.  Bet you see some bubbling on the quarter under a scope.  

Guess it's a unique kind of find....but I'm sure you'd prefer they were separate.

No idea on the Euro coin....will be fun to see what the experts say.

ZIncoln

You know I did not consider a fire but thats possible at this site. I've found several silver coins that were cooked and they were hard to identify anything but a silver disk. Thanks you are most likely right. 

strick

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27 minutes ago, PimentoUK said:

Europeans to the rescue?
The mystery coin is 'copy' of a Mary Queen of Scotland coin.
It reads: MARIA DEI G SCOTOR REGINA on the obverse.
( Mary, by the grace of God, Queen of Scotland )
The original coin would've been a gold coin, something like this 60 Shilling / 3 Scottish Pounds:

https://colnect.com/en/coins/coin/100043-60_Shillings_3_Pounds_Ryal_60_Shillings-1542~1567_-_Mary_Queen_of_Scots-Scotland

... or the smaller 30 shilling piece.

Whether it was intended to deceive ( maybe it was gold plated? ) or just a replica, to be used as a lucky token, or as a gaming piece, I don't know.

But it's worth looking into.

Thanks Pimento I had a feeling you would be able to help. I had found about 4-5 fake European coins in this exact park over the years so I just figured it was another one but the fact that it was holed gave me a tiny smidgen of hope lol. 

strick

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Natural electrolysis on the coin stack eh?  Was it in salt water?

If the Mary Queen of Scotland coin is a fake, and the original was gold, perhaps it was originally gold plated to pass as the real McCoy?

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The hole is curious in itself.
Coins pierced in order to thread a lace etc through them would have a larger hole.
Coins pierced to 'void' them, for example demonetised ones, usually have quite obvious punch marks, usually near the centre.
A forgery may be tested by various means, scraping, filing, punching, bending; so it may be there for that reason.

Any idea what metal it is ? The dark patina is flaking off, not typical of silver tarnishing. But there's no obvious green verdigris type deposits, that a brass/bronze coin would have.
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