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The Garrett ATX and the Minelab CTX 3030. Are they an odd couple, or a perfect couple? Here is a side by side photo for your consideration.

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Minelab CTX 3030 and Garrett ATX

The Garrett ATX and Minelab CTX 3030 share a certain similarity of design with coil cables hid inside the lower rod assembly and controls on the end of the handle. Both are waterproof to 10 feet. Yet they are also exact opposites in that the CTX is one of the best discriminating VLF detectors you can buy, whereas the ATX is a dig it all PI detector designed for maximum depth in very difficult ground. They actually do make a really good pairing as they complement each other very well.

I am an avid prospector and also a very avid jewelry hunter who needs to be able to hunt in the water. It would be a very hard thing for me to do, but if I had to narrow it all the way down to only two metal detectors, you are probably looking at the two I would choose. I would be making quite a few compromises but the bottom line is I can do just about anything I need to do with these two detectors together, and do it quite well.

As it is when looking at the two it really boils down to whether you need good discrimination or not. The CTX has it, the ATX does not.

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There was no warp in the space - time continuum yesterday, nor did I see a smoking crater to the east of me this morning, so it must have gone OK.

On the other hand, all the damage could have occured on a different reality plane - you never know with that sort of thing.

A few more days of this warmer weather and you'll be able to take them out in local parks and schools.

After Christmas sometime?

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Two nice-looking machines, right there...   :)

 

Christmas presents?

Steve

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