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I Determine How Much Ai Understands About Gold Detecting


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Now if only we could ask it where to go to find gold coins, valuable rings, or stashes with a metal detector...

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8 hours ago, jasong said:

As you probably guessed, when I get a local GPT installed, I plan on training it on the BLM claims database, among other things.聽馃檪

GIGO 馃槉

I'm assuming you haven't yet tried to use the MLRS extracts?

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To show some of limitations and how it's training data means everything, here I set GPT3 out on some rock ID's. It really hasn't had an extensive amount of training data, so it's limited in it's capabilities. I doubt it's been given this task much, if at all prior to me asking it.聽(Note: ChatGPT has capabilities like this restricted to the public, GPT3 is not ChatGPT).

But still, being able to scrape a graphic from a website instantly, no external programs just the AI, and take a wild guess, is interesting. The more recent GPT models with more extensive training might be a bit better.聽

ME: What is the rock at the URL below? https://www.detectorprospector.com/uploads/monthly_2023_04/20230415_180039.thumb.jpg.d29b51c21f4181603e44774f411059c1.jpg

GPT3: The rock in the picture appears to be a quartz crystal. (solution: It was a quasi-thunderegg type chert nodule, technically SiO2 like quartz I guess but not a single crystal).

ME: What is the rock at the URL below? https://www.detectorprospector.com/uploads/monthly_2023_04/FBF33A48-13DD-44BE-B35B-6F420C50089D.thumb.jpeg.29cf0fee166b29a59821e36dfea18c0c.jpeg

GPT3: The rock in the picture appears to be a piece of petrified wood. (solution: who knows, I think a strange chert nodule. But it does look like a pseudo-fossil)

So yeah, it got 0/2 correct, unless the 2nd one turns out to be petrified wood by some odd chance. But the capability is there. More advanced models, and more directed and specific training could produce a semi-useful rock ID'ing AI maybe? If they open up GPT4 to the public, I might try to train it on specifically rock ID's out of curiosity.聽

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On the other hand, maybe it knows a bit more about something more common like flowers (an ode to HAL 9000)?

ME: What are the objects pictured on the image at the following link? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteraceae#/media/File:Asteracea_poster_3.jpg

GPT3: The objects pictured in the image are various Asteraceae flowers, including the daisy-like Leucanthemum vulgare 'Filigran' flower, the yellow-petaled Rudbeckia hirta 'Maya', the pink-petaled Centaurea macrocephala, and the purple-petaled Echinacea purpurea.聽

It correctly guessed they were Asteraceae flowers - daisies - (it was in the file name). It got one dead on (Leucanthemum vulgare), the other 3 are incorrrect, but it shows it's actually trying to ID them based on the actual image and not just the text accompanying the image - and that it recognizes multiple different species of similar looking plants. Again, this is just GPT3, a older, fairly untrained AI, there are much better available right now but they cost money or are difficult to install/run.

Also interesting is some of these species are not on the actual Wikipedia page, so it's not just scraping text from the photo's source page either, but attempting some kind of reasoning (albeit, not totally correct).聽

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19 minutes ago, Clay Diggins said:

GIGO 馃槉

I'm assuming you haven't yet tried to use the MLRS extracts?

True enough haha.

No haven't put it on the MLRS extracts yet. They are so big that I'd need a local GPT installed to really digest it, and that's my next step but it's gonna take some time to figure out how to do that, which one to use, etc. And this was something I was just doing out of curiosity last night because I wanted to both get myself updated on AI tech, and I had like 200 geology pdfs I wanted to read before bed, among other things. I ended up not reading any of them and staying up until 3 AM learning about AI stuff instead and now I gotta go fix a broken pipe and prime some textured walls, back to normal work.聽

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Ok, last one. This one shows the difference between a less powerful, less trained AI (GPT3) and a more advanced model with much training data and public use (ChatGPT). I ask each AI the same question about detecting locations, and any US based nugget hunter can immediately spot the difference in accuracy/usable response.聽馃槄

ME:What specific spot in Arizona would be the best place to look for gold nuggets with a metal detector?

GPT3: One of the best places to look for gold nuggets with a metal detector in Arizona is the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix. This area is known for its rich gold deposits, and it is a popular spot for metal detector enthusiasts.

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ME:What specific spot in Arizona would be the best place to look for gold nuggets with a metal detector?

ChatGPT:聽

Arizona has a long history of gold mining and is known for its gold-rich areas. Some specific spots in Arizona that are known for gold nuggets and could be good places to search with a metal detector include:

  1. Bradshaw Mountains: Located in central Arizona near Prescott, the Bradshaw Mountains have a history of gold mining and have produced gold nuggets in the past. The Lynx Creek Recreation Area, located in the Bradshaw Mountains, is a popular spot for recreational gold panning and metal detecting.

  2. Vulture Mountains: Located in central Arizona near Wickenburg, the Vulture Mountains have been known to produce gold nuggets, especially in the vicinity of the Vulture Mine. Metal detecting in dry washes and gullies in the Vulture Mountains could potentially yield gold nuggets.

  3. San Domingo Wash: Located in western Arizona near Morristown, San Domingo Wash is known for its placer gold deposits. Metal detecting in the washes and desert areas along San Domingo Wash has the potential to yield gold nuggets.

  4. Rich Hill: Located in western Arizona near Stanton, Rich Hill is a well-known gold prospecting area that has produced gold nuggets in the past. Metal detecting in the washes, gullies, and hillsides of Rich Hill could yield gold nuggets.

  5. Quartzsite: Located in western Arizona near the California border, Quartzsite is a popular area for metal detecting and gold prospecting. The nearby Plomosa Mountains and Dome Rock Mountains are known for their gold deposits, and metal detecting in washes and dry creek beds in the area may yield gold nuggets.

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27 minutes ago, Redz said:

So could you train it on a specific small square of geology where you know gold to be, and have it find similar

It's a hard question to answer both because I'm just recently learning this stuff, and because from my limited experience one thing has become semi-clear:

The trick to getting useful AI responses (like a detector) is a skilled operator who knows how to get the right responses out of the AI, and how to teach/train them properly for the task at hand. What one person gets may be far less useful than what a more talented person gets. Some pet owners have well trained dogs, others not so much... Me, I'm a new, unskilled, pet owner right now., and my dog is still peeing on the carpet.聽馃槃

Something like "AI operator" may be a skilled job of the future.聽Programming operators, electrical engineering operators...maybe geology operators? Things like programming are easy to learn/teach since it can easily digest the information...geology is more abstract/interpretational/visual. It's fields like these where skilled operators are probably going to be harder to find. That's just me speculating on the future though, could be off base.聽

But yeah, stuff like that is kinda my goal. Just much more broadly, not so much specific geology in tiny grids, but more finding large patterns in large amounts of semi-abstract data. Stuff that is extremely hard to do in SQL or database programming. These less powerful (but free, and public) AI's like GPT3 seem more suited to wide, general data approaches.聽

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9 minutes ago, jasong said:

ME:What specific spot in Arizona would be the best place to look for gold nuggets with a metal detector?

GPT3: One of the best places to look for gold nuggets with a metal detector in Arizona is the Superstition Mountains near Phoenix. This area is known for its rich gold deposits, and it is a popular spot for metal detector enthusiasts.

Yep, everybody knows the Superstitions are loaded with gold nuggets. 馃ぃ

What I see is a quick way to be just as "educated" as the bulk of people browsing the internet. I'm sure the Superstitions came up because there are tons of bogus gold treasure tales about the Superstitions on the internet. No gold but lots of internet hits created this obviously false answer. Now we can be just as smart as the internet. Oh boy.

I find it interesting that the AI promoters have re-designated computer programming as "learning". None of the current AI systems have the capability to "learn" anything. "Training" is more about training the user to form queries that conform to the current ChatGPT programming model.

With AI large databases of all the junk piled on the internet are perused for similar phrases and keys contained in your question. Other than the rules of phrasing included in the AI response model nothing that wasn't already available on the internet or your computer is used to create the AI "answer". There is no thinking or intelligence in the current AI implementations. So far no one has developed a working intelligence much less one you can interact with.

With a key value pair system like the current AI systems are using the only way to get targeted, detailed information on a subject is to tailor your query to specific and narrow definitions. Try doing the same query with google and you will get the same results plus all the junk google promotes. In that sense ChatGPT might be a better search engine but I doubt the owners will avoid monetizing your participation for long. Then we will be right back to search engines that force feed paid junk into every query.

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8 minutes ago, Clay Diggins said:

Yep, everybody knows the Superstitions are loaded with gold nuggets. 馃ぃ

What I see is a quick way to be just as "educated" as the bulk of people browsing the internet. I'm sure the Superstitions came up because there are tons of bogus gold treasure tales about the Superstitions on the internet. No gold but lots of internet hits created this obviously false answer. Now we can be just as smart as the internet. Oh boy.

I find it interesting that the AI promoters have re-designated computer programming as "learning". None of the current AI systems have the capability to "learn" anything. "Training" is more about training the user to form queries that conform to the current ChatGPT programming model.

With AI large databases of all the junk piled on the internet are perused for similar phrases and keys contained in your question. Other than the rules of phrasing included in the AI response model nothing that wasn't already available on the internet or your computer is used to create the AI "answer". There is no thinking or intelligence in the current AI implementations. So far no one has developed a working intelligence much less one you can interact with.

With a key value pair system like the current AI systems are using the only way to get targeted, detailed information on a subject is to tailor your query to specific and narrow definitions. Definitely some "black sky and tornado" potential too on the downside. Try doing the same query with google and you will get the same results plus all the junk google promotes. In that sense ChatGPT might be a better search engine but I doubt the owners will avoid monetizing your participation for long. Then we will be right back to search engines that force feed paid junk into every query.

Yeah, I agree more or less with most of that.

However, again I want to make it clear I'm using GPT3. Which is an outdated model compared to ChatGPT (GPT3.5 w/user interface), which itself is an outdated model compared to GPT4 which isn't really even released for open use to the public yet, which itself is outdated compared to GPT5 which many people are actively trying to prevent the release of for security/humanity safety reasons.

Sam Altman said in a recent interview that some of the GPT4 beta testers have said that they believe it to be an AGI, which means it's achieved general intelligence and can basically learn anything a human can, or do tasks a human can do. That makes you wonder what GPT5 is, and why Musk, etc have all signed letters trying to restrict it's release.聽

Dunno. Interesting times. I haven't seen so much blue sky potential since the early days of the internet when it seemed the sky was the limit and some new use came out daily. Definitely some "black sky and tornado" potential on the downside too... Now I really gotta tear myself away from learning and go do some actual work haha.

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18 minutes ago, Redz said:

So could you train it on a specific small square of geology where you know gold to be, and have it find similar

Probably eventually.

I've already built a system to do this with the geology maps I've digitized. I used a spatial database with standard queries and it works perfect. It's not intelligent but neither is the current AI. This type of computer analysis has been in use in the mining industry for several decades.

The biggest problem with doing relational geology is the simple fact that there is not , and never has been, a standard geology model to work from. Each geologic unit on each map are defined by the map maker with the symbols and notation they choose. Until geologists agree on a nomenclature and conform their maps to that nomenclature there will be no way to procedurally compare geology mapping across different maps.

I for one hope the geology model is not normalized. Some of the most brilliant and detailed geology mapping over time has used conventions that are not repeatable across other mapping systems. Conformation of a set of symbolism would create a very limiting system. Several groups are working to inject these geology principles into the universities. We are seeing the results of that effort now in the mining industry.

I was speaking to one of the most successful exploration geologists in history the other day and we discussed this very same issue. He's crying because he can't hire Masters or Phd level graduates that can read and understand a geology map that isn't normalized. At this point the mining companies are rejecting applications from recent graduates of particular mining schools because of their knowledge and education don't fit the actual working environment.

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