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Minelab SDC 2300 Finds 3/4 Ounce Gold Nugget


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Three-quarter ounce gold nugget found on Jack Wade Creek, Alaska on July 10, 2014 by Chris Ralph metal detecting with a Minelab SDC 2300.

Probably the largest nugget found yet with the new 2300. Congratulations Chris!

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