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Awoke to a light coming down from the attic access this morning. So I blew out the candle put down the beans, grabbed up the MD and headed up to the surface. Had no idea what I intended to detect in all this snow, perhaps pennies from Heaven. Wasn't long though before I got my first good signal and started digging. Was working this claim on the divide between the Stanislaus and Mokelumne rivers last "Fall" when winter set in and had to lay over for a spell. Don't know exactly what I have detected here but it appears to have crash landed during one of the big blows. I have included a couple photographs so you will be aware of what is headed downhill with the coming of "Spring".

The triangle pictured in the snow is a log cabin roof with access on the opposite gable. The green object in the other photograph hit in the "tin-foil range" but does not taste like metal. I knocked on what appeared to be a tank hatch but got no reply. Just I started to rebury the thing it started to hum the Marine Corps Hymn at which point I returned to the cabin for some push-ups.

In what range would a person expect to get for an empty 300 gallon propane tank at depth?

cabin.jpg

UFO.jpg

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HardPack

Here In San Antonio Tx. it has already been over a 100. I went out to hunt the other day starting at 86 and stop after it hit over 90.

Chuck

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Ridge Runner,

Currently at 7000 feet the temperatures are in the high sixties to low seventies with more weather in the forcast. To date close to 40 feet of snowfall for the season with ten feet plus on the ground. The bears are heading downhill into the river canyons looking for food. The Sierra foothills picked up 64 inches of rainfall this year. This kind of water should dig out and move the gold. You doing any civil war relic detecting?

HP

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  We're able to get to 4800' to 5000' but lots of down timber and bad roads. It's a darned good thing that the 7000 is so good at picking up crumbs and floor sweepings from pounded areas.

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Are you sure you smell gold pard, I ain't had a hit in the last ten miles...

bears.jpg

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HardPack, great post. I am trying to imagine the runoff this season, it should be exciting. I hope you get to detect soon it sounds as though it's been a long winter. Best…

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The two photos show the same location in March then in May. The next few days are warming and runoff is definitely on the way.  This area was once a logging camp then a cow camp. This side eventually drains into the upper Stanislaus.  If I can find the old bunkhouse I may in for some poker winnings. Further up slope a lady kept a cabin with a brass bed somewhere along the old spring. They were able to power a log mill with the drop from the spring head to the mill site. Lots of tree are down, going to be late June before the road opens.

March 29, 2017.jpg

May 8, 2017.jpg

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Got another MD hit today in the ferrous range. Turned to be the top section of the stove pipe. Was informed by a marmot that Spring is definitely on the way. Probably around the 4th he figured. We both have our digits crossed for the fireworks making it over the high passes in time for the celebration... along with any news about the Republic.

On this Memorial Day weekend... to the memory of all those shot full of holes and those lost in battle. 

Cabin in the Woods.JPG

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Amen brother. My 18 year old just informed me he wants to join the Army. 

strick

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Another "sign" a pointing to Spring. The high country "maple leaf bees" have come out of hibernation. Ran into the road crew today, news ain't to good for the traveler. Been pushing through 15 and 20 foot drifts, boulders and downed trees just attempting to get to the pass. Don't expect the pass will be reached anytime soon.  I tap each of these bees by hand for their tasty "broad leaf maple" flavored honey. Normally, would have a roadside "honey syrup" stand setup by now. At least got a few good listeners that can got a "B" note ... in flat.

How's the lower on the mountain detecting been going?  

Maple Bees.jpg

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