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On 12/5/2018 at 4:22 PM, vanursepaul said:

365571558_ScreenShot2018-12-04at8_41_16PM.thumb.png.7d5bd3c1fb1289dec68972888c9f98c4.png

As they say (Greenies) hope you will fill your holes in. 😁

 
 
 
 
 
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14 hours ago, fredmason said:

Beautiful and so true!

BTW

Thanks to a new Ipad I have discovered Australian Country Music...Slim Dusty is tops- may he rest in peace.

fred

uh oh, now you're searching for Aussie music you'll discover Kevin Bloody Wilson next.

I've had an absolute c**t of a day :laugh:

 

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4 hours ago, phrunt said:

I've had an absolute c**t of a day :laugh:

You can't say that in Canada  🤣🤣

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23 hours ago, fredmason said:

Beautiful and so true!

BTW

Thanks to a new Ipad I have discovered Australian Country Music...Slim Dusty is tops- may he rest in peace.

fred

Fred, You will probably enjoy John Williamson, his songs are very OZ related and he releases a few new ones each year.

 

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Yeah fill in the holes----with the backhoe!! lolol

You can't say c**t in America either---

I've found that i picked up swearing entirely too quickly in oZ-- It is not really the Christian thing to do in America---- but it is simply verbiage in OZ-

so if you Americans hear me slip, please don't judge to me too harshly---especially if it is while i am filming a deep dig on a monster nugget!

As for all the conjunctions used in OZ--- c**t is the one most likely the second most used, and the FIRST most likely to get me fired from my job,!!!!!:blink:

the second is,  f**k,   as in---

"For f**cks sakes you bloody fkn Yank! What the f**k are you doing? Quit fkn around and go find some gold!."

Not that I ever have heard this phrase before--:rolleyes:  (over ten times a day)

Yeah---those two words are 'job bombs' in the PC USA. :wink:

Just shows how different places have different meanings for the same words--

I met a lady out at a mining site where they were using a D-10 to push with (Trent knows where im talking about)

She told me that c**t was appropriate, where "fanny" was not-- seems fanny can mean the same as  what we in Merica think of as  c**t.

So while the word  'fanny' may be used all day in America...  prepare for weird looks if you say, "Hand me my fanny pack, please" while you are in AU........go figure.

Love me some OZ lingo---- It wont be long till Meekatharra will become infamous for their southern drawl.... hahahahaha

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10 hours ago, phrunt said:

uh oh, now you're searching for Aussie music you'll discover Kevin Bloody Wilson next.

I've had an absolute c**t of a day :laugh:

 

My buddy Dale of the Goldhound crew showed me Kevin Wilson on youtube---yeah that wont work in America! :tongue:

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1 hour ago, vanursepaul said:

...Just shows how different places have different meanings for the same words--

I met a lady out at a mining site where they were using a D-10 to push with (Trent knows where im talking about)

She told me that c**t was appropriate, where "fanny" was not-- seems fanny can mean the same as  what we in Merica think of as  c**t.

So while the word  'fanny' may be used all day in America...  prepare for weird looks if you say, "Hand me my fanny pack, please" while you are in AU........go figure...

Hmmmm.. Makes me wonder where they'd place the words c**ter, sn*tch (not snitch,) sn*pper (not snipper) and tw*t (not twit) in Oz speechification classification then..? For that matter, have they even ever heard those slang before, outside the possible exception of tw*t..?

For instance and as another country-to-country example: From what I understand tw*t is fairly acceptable usage-wise in at least parts of England while oh-so-no-no here Stateside..

Just curious is all, not offensive..

Swamp 

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Well, If Kevin Bloody Wilson won't work in America, I don't think Rodney Rude will cut it either...🙂

It's not unusual in Australia to go to a business and talk to a staff person who has at least two swear words in every sentence, usually a variation of the same word, f**k.   Very relaxed country when it comes to that sort of thing.  It just becomes normal after a while 🙂

 

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Crikey, Paul, couple more training seasons and you`ll be a full blown convict, cultured good enough to be a Queenslander. I`ve had a query from a local here about that Yankee "tenant" that speaks "double dutch", said he had a good yack to you while you were hunting coins. All good fun...……… but sounds like our lingo is a definite no - no in the US. 

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Words are just words, but, the snobbery of deciding which words are acceptable is alive and well in America...

I love Australia

fred 

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