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goldbrick

Calling For Help With Old Petrology Terminology!

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Steve, Thanks for posting the glossary. It looks like it will be very helpful.

I am not sure but I think I may need to apologize to readers of this thread. I have been very busy at work lately, between going to sea and also dealing with a serious industrial accident that occurred at my work place the other day. I have been quickly reading the replies to this thread when I have a few spare moments. Things have now slowed down and I was reviewing the thread when I realized that readers may think I wrote the post that I attributed to the GPEX forum. I did not write it and no where did I say I wrote it. If I committed a mistake by not attributing it originally I apologize. It was just a copy I had filed in my computer for reference. Steve, if I have committed a forum sin please eliminate this thread.

Merton

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Nope, seemed like a straight forward quote to me. No apology called for but I am sorry to hear about the accident.

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Another consideration is the mismarking / id of areas on old maps. In my area complete watersheds were mislabeled on maps so "strikes" or reports on mines were completely wrong.

 

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You may really be overthinking this. The guy really isn't saying much in the quote you cited. All of what he is listing are oxides, and they are not likely present as pure oxides, but combined in with other minerals. Soda and potassium feldspars are aluminum silicates as well, and loads of minerals have magnesium (magnesia is the oxide) in them. So basically he says that the rocks are made of typical rock forming chemicals, although that varies. He might as well say the pockets are associated with various types of common rocks and minerals - though that varies from place to place. it is a low information statement.

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Chris, thanks for the simplified explanation of the cited quote.  Upon examination your explanation makes sense to me. I appreciate it.

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