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fredmason

Most Effective 19 Inch Coil Cover

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opinions welcome regarding the "best" coil-cover for the 19 inch.

I don't like the stock cover-but, that was a forgone conclusion..

I am not sure of the choices or durability of the manufactured items...

I think the lexan is durable but...................more weight on a heavy coil.

I will say that using the 19 inch makes the 14 seem a featherweight...in comparison.

fred

 

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The weight of 0.8 or 1mm thickness of lexan is less then the available coil cover even combined with the silastic adhesive, the big advantage of the lexan is because you adhere it to the coil it stiffens it up considerably. This leads to a coil that is not affected much at all by knocking rocks, ground, trees etc. Of course if warranty is a concern this is probably is not the way to go. I now am replacing all coil covers as they wear with this mod. With nearly a season behind this mod on the 19 & 14, is the way to go for me. Wish Phoenix had told us about it 30 years ago.:wink:

A warning ensure you get Lexan or poly carbonate not Perspex, Perspex cracks splits and is just not suitable.

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Hey Fred.  The 19" coil is the first coil I haven`t glued the lexan directly onto the coil. It was my intention to remove the original and slap the lexan directly onto the coil, but when I saw the pottings were exposed on the coil I glued the stuff to the original, so I`ve got the weight of the original skid plate plus the Lexan, but as you have pointed out the coil is so heavy anyway, I think the increased weight is three fifths of five eighths of not much.      I think Norvic could be onto something about the increased stability of the coil as well.   My coil is not bump sensitive and neither is Norvics, but some people have reported their 19" coil is bump sensitive.  I`ve got 1mm but Norvic says 0.8mm, so if you can get 0.8mm that`s even better. Dave
19_skid_plate.gif
7000_skidplate.gif
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Yeah, went looking for 1mm but Hardware store had 0.8 in stock, so went with it, have done many hours on 19 this season just love it. But make sure it is Lexan you get, Nurse Paul had what he thought was lexan adhered to his 19 but it is only Perspex. Took me bloody hours to convince him he`d been conned........:smile:

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I have the Nugget Finder cover and it's ok, but I wish it was a little thicker for the price. Not much meat there and it will wear through rather soon I think with the big coil riding on top. However, it fits well and I figure I can then glue something to the bottom of it if need be, instead of glueing something to a very expensive coil. 

minelab-gpz19-coil-herschbach-nevada.jpg

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Guest Jennifer
4 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

I have the Nugget Finder cover and it's ok, but I wish it was a little thicker for the price. Not much meat there and it will wear through rather soon I think with the big coil riding on top. However, it fits well and I figure I can then glue something to the bottom of it if need be, instead of glueing something to a very expensive coil. 

minelab-gpz19-coil-herschbach-nevada.jpg

Is that the same as the Nugget Finder one Rob sells Steve?

thx

Jen

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It is and thank you Jen for pointing out I used the wrong brand name - error corrected. Yes, same one Rob sells.

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Sorry Steve but this is slightly off topic but does involve the 19" coil. Do you use the 19" very much, how do you find it (& I dont mean you open your eyes & there it is:biggrin:) have you been finding gold at depths that you think the 14" wouldnt have got? I know that last question is a bit of an unknown without actually swapping coils. Cheers.

Good luck out there

JW :smile: 

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Hi JW,

My one report on the GPZ19 so far is at 

It did get me one nugget on that outing I missed with the GPZ14 but did I miss it because it was too deep - or did I just miss it?

My gut feeling is that as is usually the case nearly all gold a GPZ19 can hit can also be hit by a GPZ14. I have a suspicion, unfounded, that the best depth gains will be seen on the kind of gold that the GPZ favors anyway - porous and specimen gold. So that big coil I am guessing will get the best results on large specimen gold as opposed to solid slugs. For me this is a niche coil for oddball situations, not for constant use, as most of my gold tends to be under 1/4 oz and as a rule not really deep. However, I do have a site in mind for my very next outing however so we will see. Just another item I am learning more about over time. I promise I will have more to report in the future. I am juggling too many detectors right now (Impact, Deus HF, GM1000, etc.) which kind of drags things out as I bounce from one idea to another.

I think I sense a hidden question here. What about this coil for you? I am seeing small shallow gold so other than ground coverage I can't see how this coil can help you much.

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    • By Steve Herschbach
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      Click images for larger views....
      Fresh Out Of The Ground

      On The Scale - 1.64 Ounces!

      A Quick Rinse and a Side View Of Large Specimen

      Top View

      On The Scale - 0.79 Ounce

      My Share Of GPZ Gold After Initial Cleaning - 0.85 Ounce

      Photo Emailed To Me Of 0.79 Ounce Specimen After Cleaning

      This post has been promoted to an article
    • By phoenix
      I have noticed since I have been detecting in semi auto tracking, at the start of the day when I drop the ferrite ring on the ground, I can never hear the ferrite, but I do the thing with the quick track button anyway.  
      My question is:    Once I have set up the detector to the ferrite ring in semi auto tracking, if I NEVER touch the quick track button ever again, and never take the detector out of semi auto, do I ever have to use the ferrite ring again?
        It seems to me if you dont touch the quick track button in semi auto the detector always has the correct ferrite balance regardless of ground conditions.  Dave
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