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LuckyLundy

Rye Patch Sweat ( Sweet ) Hunt!

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Rick,

I hate to have to tell you this, but you might have a "Leprechaun Loyalty" issue. I am convinced that your little friends have helped me on several occasions while nugget hunting with you. Sounds to me like you are going to have to round those little guys up, then give them a good talking to about loyalty!! 

Kidding aside, your willingness to help others and your infectious enthusiasm are greatly appreciated.

I have heard a lot of positive comments about Rudy from you and Ken P.  Very happy for Rudy, he has got things figured out, that is plain to see.

Plan to get out to Rye Patch in mid Oct., hope to see you there. Maybe finally get to meet Rudy.

Best to Robin

Joe

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Joe,

Rudy's started prospecting with us years ago and hardly knew more than turning his GP 3000 on.  He cut his teeth quickly and soaked up everything our small group could teach him.   A great student and now a great prospector!  He loves showing his Sensei his skill...much to often, lol.  We will see you in Rye Patch in October for the hunt & Steaks.

Rick

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On 27/08/2017 at 4:08 AM, LuckyLundy said:

Peg,

Rudy & I, sell all our gold!  Them little Bread & Butter nuggets are the key to prospecting!  The Lobster & Steak nuggets will follow.  Just enjoy the pile of smiles as them little nuggets add up!

Rick

Damn good attitude Rick. Awesome find. Well done.

Good luck to you out there

JW :smile:

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