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Tmox

Thanks Steve For The First Ring

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I've been working the Humboldt County Fair Grounds with my F75 for awhile and getting a daily ration of pocket change from the junk but no love finding a ring. Today I was reading about you using your F75 for nuggets and in particular digging a tailing pile and digging a 22 signal that was nice and consistent.  I know all gold does not read 22 but I got a nice 22 signal that was solid and up comes this little ring!  I was successful because I got out of the mindset of just digging coin signals and started digging solid signals even when they are in the foil or zink range.
 
It was you comment on digging a 22 signal that stuck and clicked for me.
 
Thanks so Much!
 
Tim

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Edited by Tmox
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Congrats on your ring find..... WTG

With all the technology we have in our detectors we get a little lazy sometimes. We expect too much from them when it comes to target ID.

There is no machine made and in all truth probably never will be made that can discriminate between a gold ring and a pull tab or zink penny or a piece of can slaw or a nickel for that matter. 

The electrical characteristics can be just too similar.

So the old saying of...."If you want the gold, you got to dig it all." ..... is the rule to success.

I like many may start my hunt digging most everything, then as I start to get fatigued I tend to let some targets pass. It has always been early in the detecting day when I have made my best finds.

Hope this helps a little. Good luck out there...:cool:

And here is something that also may help you.... See the bottom line on the MXT control pod?

See the section for GOLD? Now draw straight lines up to the targets line.... Gold falls in from the high iron range clear up to a quarter.... That's is a significant range and if your neglecting targets in that range you ar risking missing the gold.

Happy digging....:blink:

 

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Hi Tim,

Congratulations! Gold does indeed fall all over the range so you just got lucky, but glad it was something I said that helped the luck happen.

Your photo links did not work so I removed them. You can edit your post to try and add again. The easiest way is just upload them to the forum.

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