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davsgold

Battery Alternative For SDC 2300

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13 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

The SDC though... for starters you have four "C" cells! At 5.1 lbs I would say a worthy goal would be for under 4 lbs in a dry land configuration. Something ideal for working in very steep, vegetation covered, mountainous terrain.

G'day Steve

Seeing as you have mentioned the batteries in the 2300, we have changed to the Li-ion 18650's with the adapters about a year ago, less weight more power 2 batteries instead of 4 like the original "C" cells

I don't know if anyone in the USA have started using the 18650's but there are quite a few in Aus and with no ill effects from the extra voltage and perhaps even a slight advantage, this extra voltage maybe just a feel good thing or it maybe real, I don't seem to be able to get a definite answer as to whether the extra volts translates into a usable advantage, but to us using it there seem to be.

Somebody with an Oscilloscope maybe able to hook up a test between the old "C" cells and the 18650's with the 2300 running the both types?

cheers dave  

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These are the Pictures of the actual setup, it just slides inside the SDC2300 inplace of the original 4x "C" cells

end pin.jpg

inside size.jpg

inside view.jpg

Total length2.jpg

Total size.jpg

with 18650 fitted.jpg

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love it! Thanks Davo!

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Seems a top battery alternative for the SDC, I went with it a few months ago, and also feel it has added to the performance of the SDC, in both smoothness and audio response, certainly the extra voltage hasn`t caused any problems. Be interesting to see if indeed the performance has been boosted by perhaps connecting it to a oscilloscope. Of course warranty would probably be voided once fitted.

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How would anyone know what batteries you had been using?  We have the batteries (AA) readily available here but the adapter ... that would be the trick.  There is enough info there to build your own.

I don't use my 2300 enough to justify the difference in weight reduction or increase in performance.  

Mitchel

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22 hours ago, mn90403 said:

How would anyone know what batteries you had been using?  We have the batteries (AA) readily available here but the adapter ... that would be the trick.  There is enough info there to build your own.

I don't use my 2300 enough to justify the difference in weight reduction or increase in performance.  

Mitchel

G'day Mitchel

These are not "AA" size cells, the Lithium Li-Ion 18650 size cells are longer and thicker, and to use in the SDC2300 you need 2 cells, plus the 2 adapters to take up space, if you don't use the detector enough to justify the change is only something you can decide, it's just an alternative solution for a power option in the SDC2300. :smile:

These are the exact batteries that I am using, 2x Genuine Panasonic 3500mAh NCR18650GA Lithium Li-Ion

I have tried the cheap high mAh ones but they are not very good.

cheers dave

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https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1289023

Above is a link to  STL files and basic instructions if you have a 3D printer and are a wee handy with your hands, you`ll require a couple of paper clips and a few basic tools. This is an adaptor that uses a  18650 Li-Ion battery to replace 2 C cells. 2 of these are required, remember the voltage is higher thus you may void your warranty doing this. I mention this because the RISK IS ALL YOURS, although I have a 3D printer I went with the kit, just wasn`t in the mood to chase up the batteries, charger etc.

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Thanks for posting Davsgold,

i was due for a set of replacement batteries for my SDC vac so have just ordered the 18650 and adapters will be sure to let you all no how they go.

 

 

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