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Gerry in Idaho

Equinox Blow Up Is Just Competition, What Do You Think?

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Great post Gerry. You’re a man after my own heart. Best of luck out there!

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OMG! Gerry just started a fire storm . There will be people pre ordering the Hurricane Force series before it is announced and be upset when it don't arrive days after the announcement. 

I already checked Cabela's for a Hurricane Force 5 but It is back ordered so I guess i will wait a cpl of years. Kellyco shut their website down and turned off the phones.. 

I am # 6000 on the pre order list with one dealer and  # 202 with another

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Nice Hat Gerry, er ah Sombrero!!

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I thought Gerry was talking about the battery 'blowing up' and the 'competition' was using the story! 

Minelab has been developing some good products but they have also been developing some good hype prior to release making it seem like it is a 'must have' or you will be wasting your time swinging something else.  I feel this way right now.

Mitchel

 

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Thanks for the support Steve.  Without your openness to this forum allowing us all to express our most deepest inner feelings... about the hobby we so enjoy and the people who help educate/promote it.

Yes I stand up to many and voice my concerns, but I want those folks to realize.  it is not that I am trying to be a pain in their asses (but at times I am).   It is more to the point that I care about this hobby and the manufactures that make detectors for my customers.  If my customers have problems with a product or service department, then I have issues too.  If I feel a manufacture is not handling something proper and it affects my customers, then it affects me.  My life has been with a detector in hand, at least 40 years anyway.  My only source of income is selling adventure to customers.  The detector is all about Adventure.  Now folks, lets grab a few machines and go have some fun.

 

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Let's not forget Macro and Nokta on that list--fine machines at reasonable prices that definitely made Minelab and other MD makers pay attention.

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11 hours ago, Dubious said:

Let's not forget Macro and Nokta on that list--fine machines at reasonable prices that definitely made Minelab and other MD makers pay attention.

Dubious,  No disrespect to them, as I have found gold with the Macro and like many of its features.  I was referring to the bigger brands here in the US that were popular many moons ago.  Hats off to Macro, Nokta and any other good competition as the more options we as users have the better the prices points become in the long run. 

Photo is the 1st gold nugget I found with the Macro Gold Racer in AZ just as they released them into the US.  last shot is one of my staff members (Scott) in the photo.  Please don't disk him for crappy coil control as it should be right on the ground. 

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On 2/25/2018 at 1:35 PM, Gerry in Idaho said:

last shot is one of my staff members (Scott) in the photo.  Please don't disk him for crappy coil control as it should be right on the ground. 

Don’t be a high-looper, Scott! 🤣

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