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Thanks Gerry. The space rock was found with the GPZ 7000. By virtue of its weak magnetic attraction and the equilibrated nature of its interior, I’ve concluded that the stone is most likely an L6 chondrite. This type of meteorite has a low total iron content, and is much more responsive to a VLF detector such as the Gold Monster 1000, so I’ll be searching the area for more fragments using it instead of the Zed.

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Superb find Lunk! Congratulations! Good luck with the fragments. Are you going to register the find with The Meteoritical Society?

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5 minutes ago, Randy Lunn said:

Are you going to register the find with The Meteoritical Society?

Eventually, yes, I will have it classified and submitted to the Met Soc for acceptance into their database...a process I’ve gone through a few times now.

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Amazing Lunk but I know you work at it. I wonder how many meteorites I have walked by over the years due to my focus on gold. I am trying to pay more attention but it is like I have to focus on one or the other, and so far I have always chosen to focus on gold.

Congratulations on a great find!

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I know what you mean, Steve. It helps in that regard if you spend a day strictly looking for meteorites on gold-barren ground. All of my cold finds have been made while nugget shooting by just happening to swing the coil over them as I was searching for gold.

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14 hours ago, Lunk said:

Pictured is a 15 gram meteorite fragment I came across while detecting for gold nuggets in the Arizona desert today, in an area with no recorded meteorite falls. The stone is from a relatively recent fall; the primary and secondary fusion crusts are still quite black and unoxidized. Now the real fun begins: searching for more fragments!

70CF0329-45BC-4DE3-A638-CC2C818B11B6.thumb.jpeg.8c3b2309fae5953ef9fde8140217542a.jpeg

EE62F818-349F-4F48-81CC-CD46F7CF97D7.thumb.jpeg.8c5bd4a34bffd1ee70ee415d45cc96fa.jpeg

Way to go.  Who else but one of the best in the West.

Nice finds my friend. D

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Congrats Lunk, you have been killing it in Arizona on cold finds.

Dave

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