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Recovery Speed & The Conveyor Belt


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Guest calabash digger

I believe what your saying about it seeing targets others cant . I saw it first hand the other day on the pounded relic site I was on in the iron.

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Great explanation Steve!

Although  for a second, it seemed like one of those tricky high school mathematical  word problems....

Two boats on opposite banks of a river start moving towards each other. They first pass each other 1400 meters from one bank. They each continue to the opposite bank, immediately turn around and start back to the other bank. When they pass each other a second time, they are 600 meters from the other bank. We assume that each boat travels at a constant speed all along the journey. Find the width of the river? 

 

The number of pupils in school A is equal to half the number of pupils in school B. The ratio of the boys in school A and the boys in school B is 1:3 and the ratio of the girls in school A and the girls in school B is 3:5. The number of boys in school B is 200 higher than the number of boys in school A. Find the number of boys and girls in each school. 

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If a train leaves Paddington Station at 0900 hrs with 15 people, travelling at 45 mph, with a full tank of diesel and the rain starts at 0930 hrs from an easterly direction.  

How long will it be ‘til I give up calculating anything and just go detecting :biggrin:

Your analogy is good Steve.  I’ll be honest and say I really didn’t understand what recovery speed was all about until I read this.  

So, as I seem to write most days, thanks :wink:

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  • 2 years later...

Steve, this is a brilliant analogy. I'm going to have to call you the metal detecting preacher haha. I'm new to the hobby, only 2 months in, maybe three. The conveyor belt analogy you used helped me to understand, with a little more depth, how recovery speed works. It would be cool if you had an analogy for all the basic functions of a metal detector. The nice thing about analogies / parables, is they make a complex idea, understandable to even the most lay person. I appreciate the time and effort you put into these articles. I know they say when you're just starting out with the Equinox 800, that it's good to just start in park one and leave the settings alone, but I wouldn't mind upping the recovery speed to seven based on your analogy. 

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Thanks, I’m glad you found it helpful. When starting out leaving controls alone is best, but then picking just one and experimenting with it in the field to learn exactly what it does takes you to the next level. Problems occur when people adjust controls not knowing what it is they are adjusting. Adjusting multiple controls at once if you don't know what they do is always a bad idea.

In a nutshell if targets are sparse, use lower recovery speeds. The higher the target density, the more benefit to higher recovery speeds. Hot rocks also qualify as targets, so there is benefit to running higher recovery speed in highly mineralized ground.

Here are some more articles...

 

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3 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

When starting out leaving controls alone is best, but then picking just one and experimenting with it in the field to learn exactly what it does takes you to the next level.

Steve, I am sorry for not reading this sooner as you have cleared up some things that I had thought about.

Since I am fairly new to this I think this was one of the most useful articles I have read.

Thank you For all the hard work you do for everyone on this forum.

 

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I am glad this post has resurfaced. Wish I would have paid attention to it then.

I have been into the Nox's for the last 2 years and am still going round-n-round with settings. 

There is an interesting in-depth post in another forum on the subject of recovery speed and iron bias.

The moderator there is advocating running rec speed at 3 with max sens because this is where the Nox shows it's best performance as he calls it "maximum tuned". Any deviation below or above this gets the Nox "out of electronic tune."

I've taken bucket listers  and other good finds from high settings to low settings and I honestly don't know which is better. 

I'm leaning more toward what Steve's advice is on this because it just makes sense to me. 

I'm currently hunting a heavy iron & trash site that has not been producing much lately but my buddy with his Etrac is still pulling out old coins, etc and I am walking right past them. My settings are low recovery, high sens, 0 IB, 50 tones. 

High or low settings? I'd like to hear more about it on this particular forum. 

Your thoughts on this Steve? 

 

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It’s not my advice, it’s how recovery speed works. It’s in the manual. Low recovery speed in dense trash misses targets. Out of electronic tune... nonsense. Why have a control if that were true? Maybe in a theoretical air test type way, but that ignores why the control exists. I said it above... here it is again.

On 4/7/2020 at 8:54 AM, Steve Herschbach said:

In a nutshell if targets are sparse, use lower recovery speeds. The higher the target density, the more benefit to higher recovery speeds.

If any control has a perfect setting and no other setting is good for anything then the control would not exist. The machine would just be dialed in at that perfect setting. May as well say that the only sensitivity setting you should use is maximum - horrible advice.

You will never actually learn anything without experimenting in the field. Pick a dense trash location and vary the control and see what happens.

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