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Relic Hunt With The Nokta Impact


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I went back to Ohio for a week to show off our new little boy and see family. I begged and pleaded until Steph finally gave in and allowed a day of metal detecting. I took back the Nokta Impact and Fisher F22.. I'm not going to go into the F22 yet as I haven't written up an article but I will say the Nokta Impact did absolutely perfect.

 When I lived in Ohio I was mostly a relic hunter. Overlaying old maps and hunting in fields where old houses and other things once stood. I was really excited to see how the Impact would do. Well, it did better than I could even imagine! These sites are tough to hunt. Although little to no modern trash you have to fight the heavy iron debris to get to the good finds. Where the house or structure stood is where you will just find a ton of nails and iron, I call this ground zero. When I am hunting ground zero I have always used smaller coils with any other detector I've ever hunted with these sites. With the Impact I was able to run my 11 inch coil in even the heaviest of iron with no issues!

 I've talked about it a lot but worth mentioning again. The Iron volume setting is amazing! I was able to hunt with the iron volume turned way down or off. I preferred it on to know when I was in the thickest of iron but it was nice not to have to listen to it at full volume.

 As far as finds - I only managed a few buttons, musket balls and my friend managed a nice button and large cent. I found lots of small copper,brass and lead scrap. I have pounded the two sites I was at in the past. This past fall when I went back they were the only two fields around that the crops had been taken out of and this time they were the only two I could find that weren't flooded! I feel like I'm destined to be stuck in these two sites every time I go back!

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I know we spoke on the phone but I figured in case anyone else wanted to know I would put it out there. Very simple answer, I don't know, I haven't used an Equinox and not enough out there yet to go on. I suspect the Equinox will be a great detector and I would wait and see how people like them.

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/20/2018 at 10:13 PM, relicmeister said:

Hey mike, congrats on the "little man"

im a big fan of the podcast. love to talk detectors with ya sometime. 

anytime! I love talking metal detecting

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