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Ridge Runner

White’s New Ground Hawg Shovel

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I don’t have one but they do have the look it will be around for you a long time .

I don’t or see the need I’d have to call on it often but like so many things it’s good for it to be near when the need calls.

I’d like to have another’s opinion on this shovel if you have one.

I’ve seen it would have come in handy to beat off the number of kids I’ve had around me while detecting . haha Really I’ll help any young person in anyway I can if they show interest in detecting. Even to the point of giving them a detector.

This may be another item I may have to come home with from that Treasure Show.

Chuck

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I bought the Hawg after comparing a lot of shovels.  I'm glad I did. I love it!

This shovel cuts plugs like a hot knife through butter...and clean cuts as well.  Very sharp edges out of the box.

The only thing I wasn't thrilled about was the bright orange color, but I took care of that with a rattle can of Olive Gray Rustoleum paint. The sheath that comes with the shovel is also nice and is made to last.  Not very heavy, and well made. One of the happiest purchases I have made in recent times! It's giving Lesche a run for the money!

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SittingElf

Thanks for the quick reply. That’s what I was hoping to hear

You should be receiving your pinpointer in the mail today. Do check it out and let me know if all is well.

Chuck

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A month later and a LOT of digging with the Hawg in various ground conditions, and the shovel is still like new! This thing is holding up to abuse really, REALLY well. Don't see any significant dulling edges, even after punching through gravelly soil regularly.

If I lost it somehow, I would unhesitatingly purchase another!

Frank

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Frank

This is what we like to hear about any product we put our money out for. It not only may look good but prove it’s self to be of good quality over time.

Chuck

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I have one as well. I don't use it as often as I thought I would. I prefer a small shovel that can fit in my hammer sling. I would love to use my Ground Hawg more often, I just don't want to draw attention or give people an exaggerated sense of the holes I'm going to be digging. I like it for a deep woods or field relic shovel. It does a great job at getting to deep items fast. It is built with the same quality as Lesche. Well worth the $60 I payed. My only advice is don't try to use it to leverage huge roots or oversized rocks because you will feel it begin to bend. Even a shovel this well made has its limitations. 

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Very well made and well worth the money.  White's did good.  Excellent relic digging tool.  I love mine.

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