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I have 2 Gold Bug Pro DP's, I have Nel Sharpshooter, Nel Snake and also the 10" Elliptical coil for them, along with the stock coils which are 5" and 11".

Both my Gold Bug Pro's run at maximum sensitivity with the Nel's and the 10" and 11" Fisher coils perfectly, if I put the stock 5" coils on and try run maximum sensitivity even holding them up in the air they're finding targets all over the place in the air,  this only happens with the 5" hockey puck coils.  They quiet down and run fine about 75% sensitivity. 

I'm asking all the current and former GBP owners if they had the same experience.

I found this review saying he can't turn it past the 12 o'clock position and keep it stable and he seems happy with that, for me that's odd as its only half way, I can crank it all the way up on all coils except the 5" and it be perfectly stable.

http://raregoldnuggets.com/?p=2420

So I was wondering if my 2 x 5" coils both have issues (unlikely to be 2 faulty ones), or they're just like that.  They're still under warranty so I want to find out while they're covered.

I checked and both my GBP's run the version 4 firmware.

I am fond of my GBP's, they've been taken over now by my GM1000 and Equinox but I still want to use them once I get better at prospecting and see how they do.  They were my first Gold Prospecting machines, and they're under a year old so it would be a shame to not use them ever again and retire them.  In my amateur attempts at testing them on small gold nuggets I've found with my other detectors they do seem to pick them up to an acceptable degree, especially the larger nuggets.

 Steve H maybe able to weigh in on this as I know he was once quite the fan of the GBP.

 

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When you adjust the gain knob there is a numeric value on screen.  So when you say

8 hours ago, phrunt said:

They quiet down and run fine about 75% sensitivity.

is that  the reading on the screen?  I also have multiple coils and I can't say I've run everyone at max (100) gain, but I can't believe I've stayed under 75 every time with the 5 inch coil.  I typically set mine at 90.  And except for occasional (rare?) EMI interference I don't ever remember having to lower the gain because of the noise you are describing.

In my experience with the Fisher F75, the larger coil (7x11 in^2) is the one that picks up EMI worse compared to the 5 in.

I'm really busy today but I'll take my Gold Bug Pro outside this weekend and play around with the gain.

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10 hours ago, phrunt said:

Steve H maybe able to weigh in on this as I know he was once quite the fan of the GBP.

Still am! The base $499 Gold Bug (here in U.S.) is still my pick for an entry level nugget detector. However, other than testing I never used the 5” coil and so can’t help much with this one.

Bad coils may, above a certain sensitivity setting, overload, causing a continuous blaring noise. This happens even if the detector is completely stationary.

You seem to be saying however that your machine just starts getting false signals above a certain setting. That sounds more like electrical interference to me.

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4 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

Still am! The base $499 Gold Bug (here in U.S.) is still my pick for an entry level nugget detector. However, other than testing I never used the 5” coil and so can’t help much with this one.

Bad coils may, above a certain sensitivity setting, overload, causing a continuous blaring noise. This happens even if the detector is completely stationary.

You seem to be saying however that your machine just starts getting false signals above a certain setting. That sounds more like electrical interference to me.

I do like my GBP's, don't get me wrong if we had bigger nuggets around here they would be great, although here they're almost the same price as a GM1000, local Fisher dealer, GBP single 5" coil version $1030, The GM1000 $1173 with 2 coils and a Minelab Hat :laugh: I brought the DP version which was even more expensive than the GM1000 but I didn't know what I was doing at the time as I've never used the included coils anyway.  If our dealers didn't want to make such high profit margins it would only be $686 for a GBP based purely off the US/NZ exchange rate.  I guess with the small market they have to have higher profit to make a living, sell less, make more which is fair enough, better than not having a dealer at all.

I think of the Gold I've detected with my other detectors my GBP with 10" elliptical coil would have found about half of it, the rest was too small for its depth for my skill level with it, my ear isn't finely trained enough to pick up the slight change in threshold needed to get the borderline stuff, that takes skill.  The GM1000 suits my skill level better :smile:

So I think they're a touch overpriced, Although on the NZ fossicking forums they were certainly one of the most popular detectors so people have obviously found a lot of gold with them in NZ.  Some people argue they're better than the GB2, others prefer the GB2, seems an ongoing battle.

I can easily run by GBP max sensitivity with all of the other coils, which is why I was wondering if the 5" are faulty, I always go to 12 o'clock, do my ground grab, up it a couple of notches (following what Steve does) and then spin the sensitivity to max, runs smooth as can be, I just set my threshold to a nice mosquito like hum.  I can lift my coils off the ground and hold them in the air on max sensitivity and nothing, just my nice hum.  If the 5" are on and I'm above 75 or so on the sensitivity if I put my coil in the air its finding targets in the air like EMI issues I can get on my T2.  

This only happens on the 5", all other coils it doesn't.  I'd never bothered with the 5" coils until yesterday I thought I'd throw one on and give it a go, one of the two was never used at all, the other just for a bit of mucking around when it was new while I waited for the Nel's to arrive, I always put the Nels on and the 10" elliptical which by the way I think is my favorite coil.

If it's normal and the 5" just doesn't like EMI that's fine as there is a lot of EMI around where I was using it, I will probably never use them anyway, but if they're faulty I'd like to know so I can get them replaced, I paid for them after all.

I've read about people putting ferrite chokes / ferrite beads on the upper end of the coil wire to help with EMI, does this work? 

choke.jpg

Thanks for any advice, it's not a big deal as I'm unlikely to ever use them anyway, even more so now I know they behave like this.

 

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6 hours ago, GB_Amateur said:

When you adjust the gain knob there is a numeric value on screen.  So when you say

is that  the reading on the screen?  I also have multiple coils and I can't say I've run everyone at max (100) gain, but I can't believe I've stayed under 75 every time with the 5 inch coil.  I typically set mine at 90.  And except for occasional (rare?) EMI interference I don't ever remember having to lower the gain because of the noise you are describing.

In my experience with the Fisher F75, the larger coil (7x11 in^2) is the one that picks up EMI worse compared to the 5 in.

I'm really busy today but I'll take my Gold Bug Pro outside this weekend and play around with the gain.

Yes, at 75% they no longer find random targets while holding the coil up in the air, above 80ish they false like mad in the air, especially at max sensitivity.  No other coil does this on my GBP.  I can run all the rest max sensitivity with no falsing in the air.  My T2 is the same as your F75, with the large stock coil it gets bad EMI on higher sensitivity.  

Maybe it's just normal, its just strange the other stock coils for the GBP don't do it, and nor do the Nels although Nel tend to handle EMI better than stock coils in all situations.

 

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8 hours ago, phrunt said:

Yes, at 75% they no longer find random targets while holding the coil up in the air, above 80ish they false like mad in the air, especially at max sensitivity.  No other coil does this on my GBP.  I can run all the rest max sensitivity with no falsing in the air.  My T2 is the same as your F75, with the large stock coil it gets bad EMI on higher sensitivity.  

Maybe it's just normal, its just strange the other stock coils for the GBP don't do it, and nor do the Nels although Nel tend to handle EMI better than stock coils in all situations.

 

Hi Simon… what you have described with your 5” DD coils is certainly abnormal. Under oppressive EMI conditions the 5” DD can chatter at higher sensitivity settings, but if that is the case then the larger DD coils will react even more to such EMI because there are more windings to act as an antenna.

The larger DD coils, including the stock 11” DD coil are significantly more subject to the effects of both EMI and magnetic susceptible iron-mineralized soils than is the smaller 5” DD coil. Hope this is useful information for you.

Jim.

PS: I’ve tried several ferrite chokes in my areas, and frankly they did not work at all.
 

 

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Thanks Jim, I didn't have much hope for the ferrite chokes but I had some laying around so today I tried one on the 5", no difference at all. I put it right near the control box end of the cable thinking that would give me the most benefit.

I find it hard to believe I'd have 2 faulty coils but perhaps that is the case.  Maybe a batch issue? I have no idea.  Both detectors were bought at the same time.  I've decided not to pursue it as I never intended to use those particular coils anyway and the coils do work, just at a lower sensitivity than the other coils.  I am sure the postage costs involved would outweigh the benefits of getting them replaced as I don't really need them.

I might just cut one open and have a peep inside, good learning experience to see how a coil is made.  Who knows, I may even see what was wrong :laugh:

Simon

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5ad9a0d797982_goldbugpro5inchcoilcutopen.thumb.jpg.2f10457681a128af5ae152f162048e9b.jpg

5ad9ab650ed09_goldbugpro5inchcutopentop.thumb.jpg.326e6ffd5eb16c45d31f74bc6410164f.jpg

This one became the sacrificial coil, good to see they're epoxy filled, didn't quite go to plan as because of the Epoxy I can't really see much of the workings of it :laugh:

I didn't mind destroying it, I'd never sell what could be a faulty coil and I was never going to use it, the other one can just go straight to the bin.  I bought it in Australia too so warranty would be a pain, just not worth the effort.

 

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      A couple of days ago I went to one of the spots kiwijw had shown me that I've done OK at especially with my high frequency VLFs and he's done pretty damn good at using his GPZ but unfortunately that turned into a skunk for me so I wanted to try find some new ground closer to town that I can get to easier.   I used my GPX 4500 with Joey coil on that trip.
      I had read the previous night about some old workings close to town that could be easily accessed in the time I had.  I put my Mountain bike in the back of the car so I could speed up my trek even more rather than walking to these workings. I had no idea where they were and I'm very prone to getting lost, all I knew is a walking track takes me to them so I jumped on my bike and took the track.
      I wasn't even sure I was going to do any detecting so I just threw my Gold Bug Pro with Nel Snake in my backpack as it packs down tiny and weighs nothing.  It also doesn't overly react to shotgun pellets so I thought may as well use that on the scouting missions so I don't spend my time digging up pellets as I didn't have very long.  I have had a bit of a love hate relationship with my Gold Bug Pros, I've struggled to have any success with them but I haven't put the hours on them either as I quickly upgraded off them.  Today proves they are very capable of finding TINY gold.
      I found various spots along my ride that looked alright for detecting, some that looked to be bedrock.  I wasn't sure so I detected around a few locations along the track and wasn't having much joy.  I stopped at a spot right by the river which was very rocky with a thin layer of dirt over the rock and looked promising. After 15 minutes of detecting around I got my first tiny little nugget using the Gold Bug Pro.  It was in a bit of a crack in the schist, I had to scrape it out with a screwdriver, my guess it was about an inch in a crack. It was 0.021 of a gram, the size I only ever expected to find with my GM1000 or Equinox 800.  I only had about 2 hours all up so after another 20 or so minutes checking the area I decided to call it quits and head back to the car. I ended up only being 15 minutes late for the wife pickup 🙂  I didn't have my phone with me so I couldn't take any photos at the time, I left it in the car by accident as I was in such a rush.
      What is significant about this for me is it's only my second ever nugget with the GBP, it was absolutely tiny and far exceeding my expectations for the GBP and my first detected nugget that I've had no help with, all my other nuggets I've detected in the past kiwijw showed me where and how to find them.  This was my lone wolf nugget, I found the location and the nugget alone.
      I never did find the old workings but there is always another day.  I am hoping kiwijw hasn't found this location yet so I can finally share with him a spot I've found that has gold, he's been a good teacher, mentor and friend.  It would be hard to find a person willing to show you how to find gold in an area you work yourself, thereby taking albeit small bits of gold off him that he would of potentially found.  A nice gesture that I am grateful of as I really enjoy the hobby and it's possible I would of given up without his help to get me started.



       
      It looks far bigger in the photos than it is, it's a tiny spec on my finger tip.  The Gold Bug Pro is very sensitive to tiny gold especially when combined with a tiny coil like the Nel Snake.

       
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